Chefs' 50 Favorite Kitchen Tools

The country's best chefs tell Food Network Magazine what they can't live without.

Categories:
Cast Iron, Mixer, Skillet
Page 3 of 5

21. Mortar and Pestle
I use it for many of my marinades, aiolis, rubs or pestos. I love it because it brings out all of the natural oils of the ingredients.
Jose Garces
Iron Chef America

I love a mortar and pestle. Grinding toasted spices, mashing garlic cloves, connects me to my ingredients and makes tasty food!
Alex Guarnaschelli
Iron Chef America

22. Mandoline
"I'm neurotic and need precision when slicing. But watch your fingers!"
Spike Mendelsohn
Good Stuff Eatery, multiple locations

23. Aluminum Foil
"I make a boat out of it to smoke delicate fish that normally wouldn't be grillable."
Tim Cushman
O Ya, Boston

24. Serrated Paring Knife
"It's the best all-purpose knife for everything from peeling shallots to coring apples!"
Marc Murphy
Chopped

25. Digital Scale
"It allows you to apply more precision to your recipe measurements."
Nathan Myhrvold
Co-author, Modernist Cuisine at Home

26. Flexible Plastic Cutting Boards
"They're inexpensive, easy to store and easy to clean. You can chop your ingredients and just pick up the entire cutting board, fold it and let everything slide into the pan."
Dale Talde
Talde, Brooklyn

27. Kitchen Shears
"I use them to open food packages, cut twine and make parchment circles for cake baking. They are great for skinning chicken, as well, and the blades come apart for easy cleaning."
Ron Ben-Israel
Sweet Genius

28. Egg Cutter
My favorite kitchen tool is an egg cutter. My daughters love to use it on their soft-boiled eggs!
Geoffrey Zakarian
Chopped

29. SodaStream
"I use it all the time to make sparkling water at home. I love how green it is with its reusable bottles, and I love how much time I save not driving to the store to purchase sparkling water!"
Mary Sue Milliken
Border Grill, Los Angeles

30. Twine
"I like to cook bouquets of vegetables wrapped in twine. I'll wrap leeks around fennel bulbs, tie them up and poach them in vegetable stock."
Michael Solomonov
Zahav, Philadelphia