3 Healthy Ways to Do Deviled Eggs

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Spring is in the air! And I could think of no better way to celebrate than gathering around a picnic table with loved ones to enjoy this warm shift in the weather (hopefully here to stay) and, of course, delicious food. A deviled egg is the perfect finger food, not only nutritious and delicious but very versatile in regard to the filling. Not to mention, something tells me you have some extra hard-boiled eggs hanging out in the fridge.

The classic version with yellow mustard and mayonnaise is sure to be a hit — but fill the eggs with barbecue sauce, hummus or mango guacamole and just wait to see the excitement and joy in people’s faces.

While the filling options may be tantalizing, the key to making the best deviled eggs is to start with perfectly hard-boiled eggs that are easy to peel. Here are some tips I learned through experimentation:

*Avoid using super-fresh eggs. If you purchase eggs at the store, then chances are they are ready for immediate use. If you purchase them directly from a farmer, though, wait at least a week before using.

*Start with hot water rather than cold water. All the recommendations I read stated that I should start with cold water, bring it to a boil, then cook the eggs for a certain amount of time. It’s true that this method produces more evenly cooked eggs, but starting with hot water results in eggs that are much easier to peel, which is very important for deviled eggs; pristine egg whites are much prettier on the eyes.

*Once the eggs are cooked, place them in an ice bath. This also helps with peeling.

Here I’ve made three different fillings, which you can whip up in minutes and evenly distribute amongst a half-dozen eggs. You can easily double or triple the recipe as needed.

How to Boil Eggs

In a saucepan, bring water to a boil. Carefully lower the eggs into the water (I use a wire colander or a ladle).

Lower the heat to a gentle simmer and cook for 10 to 12 minutes.

Drop the eggs into the prepared ice bath.

Once the eggs have cooled, tap the shells against a hard surface and peel under running water.

Mango Guacamole (for 2 egg halves)

1 egg yolk, mashed

1/2 avocado, mashed

3 tablespoons diced mango

2 teaspoons diced red onion

2 teaspoons chopped cilantro

A squeeze of fresh lime juice

Salt and pepper to taste

A dash of chili powder

Per 1 egg half: Calories 41; Fat 1 g (Saturated 0 g); Sodium 56 mg; Carbohydrate 4 g; Sugars 3 g; Protein 4 g

Hummus (for 2 egg halves)

3 tablespoons hummus, any flavor (I used eggplant hummus, but beet hummus is really good too!)

2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill

A dash of paprika

Pine nuts

Per 1 egg half: Calories 63; Fat 3 g (Saturated 0 g); Sodium 138 mg; Carbohydrate 4 g; Sugars 0 g; Protein 6 g

BBQ (for 2 egg halves)

2 egg yolks, mashed

1 tablespoon BBQ sauce

1 tablespoon plain Greek yogurt

2 teaspoons chopped cilantro

A dash of paprika

Salt and pepper to taste

Per 1 egg half: Calories 84; Fat 5 g (Saturated 0 g); Sodium 123 mg; Carbohydrate 3 g; Sugars 2 g; Protein 8 g

Method

In a small bowl, combine all the ingredients. Scoop heaping spoonfuls of the filling into the egg halves. Sprinkle with seasoning.

Min Kwon, MS, RD, is a registered dietitian who specializes in food sensitivities. She has a passion for translating the science of nutrition into real-life, applicable advice and tips. In her healthy food blog, The Adventures of MJ and Hungryman, she focuses on sharing simple yet healthy recipes made from wholesome, REAL foods.

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