Would You Drink Wine That's Blue?

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Blue wine
Photo courtesy of Gik

It’s hard to imagine that the world was clamoring for blue wine — what’s wrong with red, white and rose? — but the presumed dearth of demand hasn’t stopped someone from making it. A group of someones, that is.

Gik — with an eye toward “revolutionizing the world of wine with a blasphemous drink,” according to a release.

The sapphire-hued 11.5 alcohol by volume sip, which its makers say has an “easy sweet taste” (the official tasting notes describe it as “slightly acid, with a sudden cheerful, sweet burst”), required two years of research to come to fruition. Production includes a process in which red and white grapes, sourced from a variety of Spanish vineyards, are combined to create a base to which “organic pigments” — indigo, from grape skins, and anthocyanin, a plant-based compound — are added. It does not include an aging process. The wine itself does not include added sugar, but it does include a noncaloric sweetener.

As for how you’re supposed to drink the stuff, it is recommended that you enjoy it “nicely chilled,” though the makers say that’s really up to you. Suggested pairings are listed on the winemakers’ “anti-technical sheet”: “Sushi. Nachos with guacamole. Tzatziki sauce. Pasta carbonara. Smoked salmon.” So … kind of random.

But then again so is blue wine.

Photo courtesy of Gik