5 Ways to Keep Cool with Frozen Margaritas

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Photo by: Levi Brown Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Levi Brown Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

While a margarita on the rocks will surely get the job done, frozen margaritas are a bit more indulgent and worthy of a celebration, if you ask us, and thanks to the blender, they’re a cinch to pull together in a hurry. Start with Food Network Magazine’s easy recipe for a lime-flavored classic, then dress up the tequila-spiked original with flavorful, fruity add-ins.

Once you’ve frozen ice cubes containing a sweetened mixture of orange liqueur and lime juice, just drop a few in a blender along with tequila to turn out Food Network Magazine’s Frozen Margaritas in a flash. For even more flavor, choose among Smoky Orange Salt, Sweet and Spicy Lime Salt, and Tangy Hibiscus Salt to round out the drink.

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Photo by: Ryan Liebe ©Ryan Liebe - 2015

Ryan Liebe, Ryan Liebe - 2015

The beauty of these Frozen Hibiscus Margaritas from Food Network Magazine — apart from their striking ruby-red color — is the fact that they can be made in bulk. Just one batch will pour eight drinks, so if you’re entertaining, you can serve a crowd in one fell swoop and not have to resort to playing bartender all night long.

Frozen Mango Margarita; Ellie Krieger

Photo by: Tara Donne

Tara Donne

To save pre-party prep time in the kitchen, opt for a bag of frozen mangoes to guarantee that these icy sippers are ready to drink in just 10 quick minutes.

Photo by: Stephen Murello ©Stephen Murello

Stephen Murello, Stephen Murello

Tyler Florence puts a few pomegranate seeds at the bottom of his frosty Pomegranate Margaritas for a welcome bite of texture and burst of freshness in the drink. He uses the classic lime-juice-on-the-rim trick to help margarita salt adhere to the edge of the glasses.

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Food Stylist: Brett Kurzweil

It’s no secret that lime and watermelon are almost always better together, and in Food Network Magazine’s Frozen Watermelon Margaritas, the two flavors combine for the ultimate refreshing cocktail.

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