Someone’s Come Up with a New Way to Infuse Meat with Sriracha Sauce

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Haltom City, Texas, United States - February 20, 2015: A lot of Huy Fong's Rooster brand Thai hot sauce. The bright red bottle, with green cap, lined up and ready to take on the world, one bottle at a time. An American's favorite hot sauce.

Photo by: asiantiger247 ©asiantiger247

asiantiger247, asiantiger247

Why take the time to season your meat the old-fashioned way — painstakingly preparing it with spice blends, brines, rubs and marinades — when you can tuck a hot-chili stick in it and call it a day?

A California-based company called Sugarmade, which, according to its website, specializes in promoting products that “hold disruptive potential to current markets,” is launching Sriracha Seasoning Stix, aka “Rooster Stix.”

The flavor sticks are, Sugarmade says, a “new way to use Sriracha,” Huy Fong Foods’ immensely popular hot chili sauce. (Sugarmade is an “official” Huy Fong Foods licensee.)

“Meat, meet heat,” trumpets the product site.

So, how do the seasoning sticks work? Well, basically, you buy a jar of sticks in one of four “blends” — Classic Sriracha, Sriracha Butter Garlic, Sriracha Teriyaki and (brace yourself) a Mystery Blend, which will be named at an unknown future date by the product’s fans. Then you take a few of the sticks and jam them into whatever meat, fish or poultry you happen to be cooking to flavor it “from the inside out.” Then you cook it, same as ever.

“At about 110F the solid Stixs begin to liquefy, allowing the meat to absorb that great Sriracha flavor, leaving delicious ribbons of Huy Fong Foods, Inc. Sriracha and other seasonings for you to enjoy,” the Stix site promises.

The company had been offering free samples ahead of its scheduled February 2017 product launch, but alas those got snapped up quickly. There’s still an opportunity to get free “early bird” shipping, though, by signing up on the product website.

Definitely put us down as intrigued …

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Photo: iStock

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