How to Make Challah

Whether you’re prepping for Hanukkah or just looking to spruce up the bread basket at your holiday dinner, challah is a versatile, easy-to-make bread that is sure to impress your guests. Often made with silky honey or dried fruit, this light but dense loaf gets its consistency from several rich egg yolks. Take a look below at how Food Network Kitchens fashions Challah Crowns (pictured above), a unique twist on traditional bread braids.

This recipe makes two loaves. Divide the dough in half and roll both parts into 30-inch logs. Place one end of one log on a sheet of parchment paper and, while lifting the other end, rotate the paper so that the dough coils onto itself. Repeat with the other log on another sheet.

Once you’ve formed the loaf, moisten the loose end with water and seal it to the round.

The challah is done when its internal temperature reaches 190 degrees F.

Find more of our favorite challah bread recipes below and bake up a batch in your kitchen.

For challah that is studded with something sweet, try Food Network Magazine’s Chocolate Chip Challah Bread. Apply a quick egg wash before baking to achieve a glossy golden crust.

Food 2’s Honey Challah Bread With Currants undergoes two rounds of rising to ensure it is as yielding as possible. A generous squeeze of honey adds a warm flavor while currants add texture and pops of dark color. Serve up slices as French toast for a quick, hearty breakfast. Ina’s Challah French Toast recipe from Food Network is laced with refreshing orange zest.

Dig out that bread maker from the back of the pantry and try Food.com’s easy Bread Machine Challah recipe. Just add all ingredients to the machine and let it do the mixing and kneading for you. When braided and baked, this bread boasts the same soft interior and tender crust as its handmade counterparts.

Turn your challah loaves into a next-day dessert, with Dave Lieberman’s Challah Bread Pudding With Chocolate and Raisins recipe from Cooking Channel. Assemble this dish as you would lasagna, by alternating layers of thick challah slices and a mixture of chewy raisins and chocolate chips in a baking dish. Pour on top a custard-like combination of milk, eggs and sugar and let the bread absorb the decadent flavors.

For more Hanukkah recipes, visit Food Network’s Holiday Central.

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