Robert Irvine's Healthy Tips

Fitness and healthy eating are a huge part of Worst Cooks in America and Dinner: Impossible host Robert Irvine's daily routine. Here are his top dos and don'ts for delicious, healthy meals.

Don't think healthy foods have to taste bad. 

"When you say healthy eating, a lot of people think lettuce, tomatoes, that's it," Robert says. Healthy eating is just the correct balance of foods — mostly healthy recipes with a few sinful treats now and then.

Don't deprive yourself of the things you really want. 

"A 'diet' implies that you're deprive the body of something. I can eat french fries every day of the week if I want, but the time I eat them and what I eat in between and what exercises I do is the important thing," says the Worst Cooks in America host. "I believe if you eat correctly, you'll never have problems exercising or maintaining your weight."

Do keep it simple. 

Flavorful, healthy meals don't have to be complex, and they don't have to include two sides and a protein, Robert says. "I love to cook lean proteins like chicken, salmon and sea bass on a grill, then top with a simple black bean salsa made with canned tomatoes, black beans, onions and a little hot sauce."

Do look beyond the olive oil. 

"If you watch Dinner: Impossible, you know I use grapeseed oil for all my cooking — it has omega-3 fatty acids, a higher smoke point and no flavor, so it's the perfect all-purpose cooking oil."

Don't kill the vegetables!

"I grew up with my mother cooking vegetables; it was like drinking them through a straw," Robert jokes. It only takes a couple of minutes to cook fresh veggies — any more and they start to lose precious nutrients, not to mention taste.

Do learn to regulate heat. 

Robert thinks it's the most essential skill to cooking healthy meals. Heat your skillet before you cook a protein so it spends the least possible amount of time in the skillet. "Master heat control, then with any grill, any pan, any oven, you can cook nutritious meals," he says.

Do keep your pantry stocked with flavor boosters.

"Rice wine vinegar and ginger are my go-to flavor boosters — they travel with me anywhere I go! I can make them into a sauce and a dressing," Robert says. "I also keep stone-ground mustard with me at all times to emulsify dressings."

Do make friends with your blender. 

"A blender is an amazing thing — you can throw (almost) anything in to make a flavorful sauce. I use a lot of fruit, like strawberries and mangoes, to blend into sauces for proteins. For a more savory sauce, try red onions and olives atop roasted vegetables, salads, chicken or fish."

Keep Reading

Next Up

Importance of Healthy Fats

How much fat should you eat each day, and what does it do? Find out.

Why You Need Healthy Carbs

Carbohydrates give your body energy — learn about the different kinds and how much you need.

The Incredible Shrinking Chef -- Weight Loss Tips from Chef Morimoto

Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto tells Food Network Magazine how he dropped 40 pounds and gives us a low-cal recipe.

The Health Dangers of Added Sugars

Added sugars can cause you to gain weight and may harm your health. Find out how much is too much.

Eating for Your Microbiome

Learn about the microbiome diet, plus some ways you might alter your diet for better gut health, from the experts at Food Network.

Choosing the Right Meats

Grilling is one of the lightest ways to cook, but to keep it that way, pick leaner meats. Make healthy meal choices with these tips from Food Network.

Saturated Fat: Facts vs. Fiction

We clear up some of the common points of confusion about saturated fat with tips from the experts at Food Network.

Fermented Fundamentals

Fermentation is the latest DIY food trend to hit the mainstream. It may seem complicated, but it doesn't have to be. Follow these tips for homemade yogurt, kimchi, sauerkraut and more.

Five Surprising Facts About Giada

Giada De Laurentiis' healthy habits are unexpected and fun. Try one out for yourself.

How to Feel Full

How to Feel Full