Buy This, Not That: How to Make Better Choices at the Supermarket

Getting healthy doesn’t have to mean overhauling your diet. Swap these items in your shopping cart for simple steps to a healthier you.
Related To:

Photo By: Kwangmoozaa ©Kwangmoozaa

Simple Swaps

With all the options at the grocery store, making healthy choices can often seem like a daunting task. But these nine easy swaps will help take the guesswork out of what you put into your cart.

Photo: Kwangmoozaa/iStock

Buy Rotisserie Chicken, Not Cold Cuts

Rotisserie chickens are usually a great deal, beating cold cuts in both price and nutrition. Many cold cuts are processed meats (the kind that aren't great for your health) and often have additives. Remove the skin from rotisserie chicken to save on sodium and saturated fat. Then slice it up for sandwiches, pull it for burritos, or pair it with veggies for a quick snack.

Photos: Lauri Patterson and Lisa Williams via iStock

Buy Salsa, Not Queso Dip

Cheese dip is very processed and mostly adds salt and fat to chips that have ... salt and fat. Salsa, on the other hand, is made of vegetables. So while it's still often salty, you're also getting some nutrients (and far fewer calories), including lycopene — the antioxidant found in tomatoes.

Photos: bhofack2/iStock and Annabelle Beakey/Getty Images

Buy Hummus, Not Sour Cream Dip

Dip is a great enticement to eat raw vegetables (or crudites, if you're feeling fancy). And while there are plenty of healthy homemade dips you can make, when you're buying premade varieties the options narrow. Hummus is almost always a good bet. It's loaded with fiber and healthy fats, and comes in lots of flavors.

Photos: Soma Rathore and Allyso via Getty Images

Buy Plain Yogurt, Not Flavored Yogurt

Boasting probiotics, calcium and protein, yogurt is a great choice. But the flavored varieties often have more sugar than ice cream! Stick with plain yogurt, then add fresh fruit or a spoonful of jam to sweeten it. Or, swap it for mayo and sour cream in dips and use it in place of buttermilk when baking.

Photos: Riou and Dorling Kindersley via Getty Images

Buy Popcorn, Not Puffs (or Chips)

Popcorn is the hidden health food of the snack aisle, provided you stick to the plain varieties (i.e., not caramel corn or cheese). It's a whole grain, delivering 3 grams of fiber per serving, and a serving size is surprisingly massive (3 cups!). Puffs, on the other hand, offer no fiber — just some salt and fat.

Photos: Sce Hwai Phang/Getty Images and bhofack2/iStock

Buy Shredded Cabbage, Not Iceberg Lettuce

Shredded cabbage (also disguised as coleslaw mix) is one of the best convenience foods you can buy in the supermarket. Ready-to-eat, crunchy and bursting with nutrients, it's a no-contest rival to iceberg lettuce. It gives you lots of vitamin C, plus the same cancer-preventing phytochemicals found in kale and broccoli.

Photos: Yelena Yemchuk/iStock and Adél Békefi/Getty Images

Buy Light Tuna in Oil, Not Albacore Tuna in Water

When tuna is packed in oil, it retains more of its nutrients than when it's packed in water. It's an excellent source of vitamins D and K and some B vitamins. Plus, light tuna comes from a smaller fish than white — which means it has lower levels of mercury.

Photos: Stefano Oppo/Getty Images and Floortje/iStock

Buy Whole Eggs, Not Egg Whites

Whole eggs really are incredible: They're cheap, offer high-quality protein and contain a bunch of vitamins and minerals. Egg whites, in contrast, have the protein, but hardly any of the other nutrients. Also, while you might prefer the look of brown versus white eggs, they're identical nutritionally (and white eggs are usually cheaper).

Photos: Riou/Getty Images and Scott Karcich/iStock

Buy Flavored Seltzer, Not Soda

Cutting back on sweetened beverages is one of the best things you can do for your health. But if you're not the biggest fan of plain water, flavored seltzer can be a good swap for soda. It has zero calories, but comes in lots of appealing flavors, such as vanilla, cherry and melon.

Photos: Alexandra Grablewski and Tetra Images via Getty Images

Next Up

How to Make Healthy Cooking a Family Affair

Including kids in the kitchen can have numerous benefits beyond an extra pair of little hands assisting us.

Healthy Microwave Cooking

We’re not talking about zapping frozen entrees. How about real ingredients and healthy meals straight out of the microwave oven!?

Summer Cooking (and Eating), Alex Guarnaschelli Style

Hear from Alex Guarnaschelli to learn her favorite seasonal eats, plus what she piles on top of her ultimate burger.