5 Ingredients: Tomato-Basil Pizza

Friday night is pizza night in our house. Instead of ordering greasy take out, I whip up my own healthier version with five simple ingredients.
Related To:

Friday night is pizza night in our house! Instead of ordering greasy takeout, I whip up my own healthier (and tastier) version with five simple ingredients.

Tomato-Basil Pizza
Makes: 12 slices

Ingredients:
Pizza dough (1 1/2 pounds)
28 ounce can whole, peeled tomatoes, drained
4 large garlic cloves, minced
8 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, sliced
1 cup fresh basil leaves, torn

Equipment: Pizza stone, pizza pan or jelly roll pan

Pizza Dough

I definitely rely on pre-baked pizza crusts from time to time but they’re usually loaded with sodium. For this recipe, fresh dough makes all the difference. Pick up some from your local grocer or pizzeria or make you own (it’s easier than you think). This Tyler Florence recipe is my favorite.

Canned Tomatoes

Canned tomatoes are a great choice when fresh ones aren’t in season. The canned version also contains higher amounts of the antioxidant lycopene. Pick the brand with the lowest amount of sodium (my go-to brand has a very reasonable 20 milligrams per serving).

Garlic

Fresh garlic enhances the flavor of tomatoes without overpowering the whole pizza. Add more or less according to your taste. For a sweet and nutty flavor, try roasting the garlic first.

Mozzarella Cheese

A small amount of light and creamy fresh mozzarella gives this recipe just enough gooey cheese – as well as protein and calcium.

Fresh Basil

Like garlic, basil adds flavor but virtually no calories. Learn more about the health benefits and why basil made our list of the Top 5 Herbs for Healthy Cooking.

Directions:

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Place a pizza stone, if using, in the oven to heat up. Roll out pizza dough on a lightly floured surface. Gently press into a large circle or rectangle approximately ¼-inch thick.

To prepare the sauce*, hand-crush tomatoes in to a medium bowl. Add garlic, 1 teaspoon of salt and ½ teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper; stir and set aside. Top dough with a thin layer of sauce, cheese and half of the basil.

Bake for 20-25 minutes until crust is golden and cheese is bubbly. Top with remaining basil.

*Note: this recipes makes enough sauce for two pizzas --  freeze half for your next pizza night.

Nutrition info per serving (2 slices):
Calories: 390
Total Fat: 11 grams
Saturated Fat: 4.5 grams
Total Carbohydrate: 52 grams
Protein: 15 grams
Sodium: 590 milligrams
Cholesterol: 20 milligrams
Fiber:  3 grams

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition. See Dana's full bio »

You Might Also Like:

Keep Reading

Next Up

From Scratch: Best 5 Pizza Dough Recipes

Learn how to make pizzeria-style pies at home with Food Network's top-five pizza dough recipes from some of your favorite Food Network chefs.

Pizza 101

Ditch delivery pizza and check out Food Network's roundup of basic, non-traditional and sweet pizza recipes.

Pizza Night — Meatless Monday

The ultimate family-friendly meal, pizza is inexpensive, incredibly versatile and can feed a crowd. Get our recipes for a Meatless Monday.

50 Easy Pizzas

Find ideas for 50 simple pizza toppings, from Food Network Magazine.

Order This, Not That: Pizza

Make better choices at your favorite pizza chains.

Tricolor Salad Pizzas — Meatless Monday

Top cheesy pizzas with fresh salad for a healthy and delicious dinner.

The Customizable Pizza — Meatless Monday

Skip delivery pizza and make easy pies from scratch with Food Network's go-to recipes for dinner and dessert pizzas alike.

Bake Pizza in a Flash

Hot tips from Food Network Kitchens' Katherine Alford: Keep pocketless pitas on hand to use for quick weeknight pizzas, like Food Network Magazine did for these Philly Cheesesteak Pizzas.

Nutrition News: Papa John’s Ingredients, Good Fat, Creative Hydration Tips

Papa John’s to eliminate artificial ingredients and additives, low-fat diets fall out of favor, and hydrating beyond the water bottle.