Label Decoder: Pectin

You’ve seen it on hundreds of labels and may have even used it in your own kitchen—learn all the need-to-know facts about this additive.
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jam of quince

Photo by: stephane duchateau

stephane duchateau

You’ve seen it on hundreds of labels and may have even used it in your own kitchen — learn all the need-to-know facts about this additive.

What Is It?

Pectin is a gelatin-like substance that is naturally found in some fruits. It’s often added to jams and jellies to help cooked fruits reach a gel-like consistency. It can also be used to thicken barbecue sauce, cranberry sauce, canned frosting and yogurt. Some homemade jellies may call for high pectin fruit such as quince, concord grapes, currants, raspberries or apples in order to help thicken them. Fruit that is slightly underripe contains more pectin than fruits that have fully ripened.

Commercial pectins can be found on the market in liquid or powdered form. The liquid pectin is made from apples, while the powdered version is made from citrus fruits. Some folks like to use the commercial pectins to speed up the jam and jelly cooking process.

Is It Safe?

The FDA recognizes pectin on their generally recognized as safe (GRAS) list, and numerous scientific studies have found it to be extremely safe to consume.

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Toby Amidor, MS, RD, CDN, is a registered dietitian and consultant who specializes in food safety and culinary nutrition. See Toby's full bio »

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