Eating By Color: Red, White and Blue

Celebrate July 4th by getting the most out of naturally-colored red, white, and blue foods like berries, potatoes and plums.
Red White and Blue Potato Salad

Red White and Blue Potato Salad

Food Network Kitchens Red, White and Blue Potato Salad

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2012, Television Food Network, GP. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2012, Television Food Network, GP. All Rights Reserved

Celebrate July 4th by getting the most out of your red, white, and blue foods. We’re not talking artificially-colored goodies, but rather fresh and delicious fruits and veggies in naturally-patriotic tones.

Red

Red hued foods have tons of antioxidants like vitamins A and C. They get their red color from phytochemicals like lycopene and anthocyanins. Lycopene is an antioxidant found in foods like watermelon and tomatoes and helps protect our healthy tissues from free-radical damage. Anthocyanins are found in foods like cherries and strawberries. This powerful antioxidant helps fight inflammation and protects your blood vessels and nervous system.

White

White foods get their color from anthoxanthins found in foods like bananas, cauliflower, garlic and mushrooms. Many of these white good-for-you foods also contain the phytochemical allicin, which may help lower cholesterol and blood pressure. Allicin has also has been thought to help reduce the risk of stomach cancer and heart disease.

Blue

Blue and purple foods such as blueberries, figs, eggplants and plums are grouped in the same category and provide similar health benefits. These foods get their gorgeous hue from the phytochemical anthocyanin (also found in red foods).  Studies have shown that eating foods high in anthocyanins may help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer.

You can eat all three colors in Red, White and Blue Potato Salad (pictured above) or Red, White and Blue Fruit Cups.

TELL US: How will you eat your red, white and blue this July 4th?
Keep Reading

Next Up

Eating By Color: Red

Try to eat various colored food throughout the day. Each color contains different nutrients which are important to maintain a healthy diet. We told you all about the importance of eating orange-colored foods. February is Valentine’s Day and Heart Health month, so red seemed like the perfect color to cover.

Eating By Color: Green

With both St. Patty’s day and spring just around the corner, what better color to focus on than green? March is also National Nutrition Month and this year the focus is eating a variety of colors-- so be sure to check out some yummy orange and red colored foods.

Eating By Color: Orange

Throughout the day you should have a rainbow of colors --- red, yellow, orange, green, blue, purple and white. Each color is rich in specific nutrients that help make a well-balanced diet. In this series we’ll tell you why each color is important and with Halloween around the corner, we thought it was most appropriate to start with orange.

Red, White and Blue Savory and Sweet Recipes

Colorful summer produce and clever ingredients make Fourth of July food even more festive with red, white and blue shades.

Red, White and Blue Desserts ... One Last Time!

Give the red, white and blue dessert palette a last hurrah this Labor Day weekend with these festive, simple sweets.

7 Recipes More Patriotic Than Red, White and Blue

Get in the spirit by stocking your 4th of July cookout menu with all-American cookout classics that scream “America” without bothering to be red, white and blue.

Three Red Foods You Should Be Eating

Find out why you should eat more cherries, tomatoes and red cabbage.

On TV

Food Network Apps

In the Kitchen

Get over 70,000 FN recipes on all your mobile devices.

Facebook Messenger

Ask our bot for recipes, meal ideas and daily food trivia.

Amazon Echo

Just say "Alexa, enable Food Network skill" to get started.