News Feed: Big Breakfast News, Vegan Nutrition and DIY Dieting

Scrambled Eggs on a Pan

Scrambled Eggs on a Pan

Starting the Day Right

It’s a big week for breakfast news: A new study, published in the journal Pediatric Obesity, found that middle-school students who ate no breakfast or ate it only occasionally had double the risk of obesity as those who ate breakfast regularly. But students who ate “double-breakfast” — first at home and then at school — did not seem to be at any greater risk for obesity as those who ate only one breakfast, either at home or school. “It seems it’s a bigger problem to have kids skipping breakfast than to have these kids eating two breakfasts,” concluded study co-author Marlene Schwartz, of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. Meanwhile, the Deseret News weighed whether cereal, the sales of which have declined in recent years, is a breakfast food worth rescuing, and Time offered an eye-opening look at 10 healthy breakfast options enjoyed in countries around the world.

Vegan

Vegan

inscription of grains

inscription of grains

Vegan Diets Under the Microscope

Following a vegan diet — eschewing not only meat, but also eggs, dairy and other animal products — may be healthy, but new research conducted at the University of East Finland indicates that, in many cases, vegans may not be getting enough protein, berries, fruits and nuts in their diets and may rely more on fortified foods and supplements than non-vegans. “In order to ensure the intake of all the necessary nutrients, vegetarian and vegan diets need to be composed in a well-rounded manner,” the researchers noted, adding that vegans should make a point of eating foods and taking additional supplements that can fill in their nutritional gaps.

DIY Dieting

Are commercial diets worth the cost? More and more Americans are deciding the answer is no and taking their weight-loss efforts into their own hands, attempting to lose weight by simply taking a healthier approach to eating and exercising: eating less and moving more. According to a recent report by the market-research company Mintel, cited by Yahoo, 94 percent of those surveyed said they no longer consider themselves “dieters”; 77 percent of respondents said they didn’t think diets, which can get pricey, were as healthy as they may appear. “Consumers are somewhat skeptical about diet products, and instead of purchasing traditional diet-specific products, they are turning to a well-balanced diet and products that support it,” the researchers concluded.

Amy Reiter is a writer and editor based in New York. A regular contributor to The Los Angeles Times, she has also written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Glamour, Marie Claire, The Daily Beast and Wine Spectator, among others, as well as for Salon, where she was a longtime editor and senior writer. In addition to contributing to Healthy Eats, she blogs for Food Network’s FN Dish.

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