When Cravings Call, What Are They Saying?

We all get cravings, but when they come in the form of high-sugar or high-fat, calorie-dense foods, it’s your waistline that suffers the consequences. Understanding the messages behind your cravings and can help prevent unwanted weight gain.
Related To:
FNK_KALE_PISTACHIO_PESTO_SPAGHETTI_H_.jpg

FNK_KALE_PISTACHIO_PESTO_SPAGHETTI_H_.jpg

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Matt Armendariz, 2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

We all get cravings, but when they come in the form of high-sugar and calorie-dense foods, it's our waistlines that suffer the consequences. But understanding the messages behind cravings can make it easier to resist the siren call of certain foods.

Why We Crave

One theory as to why we crave specific foods so intensely is that the body is deficient in a nutrient that food contains. For example, we desperately crave potato chips because our body is in need of salt. This theory, unfortunately, lacks scientific evidence to back it up.

But carb cravings are another story. When we eat high-carb foods like bread and pasta, our blood sugar rises. This causes the body to release the hormone insulin. Insulin triggers the amino acid tryptophan to pass into the brain -- and then comes the serotonin. This chemical messenger helps regulate mood. Low serotonin levels have been associated with irritability, fatigue, impatience, depression and anger. One theory is that when the body has cravings for carbs, it may be a sign that serotonin levels are low.

Other cravings may be psychological. Depression, boredom and sadness can promote cravings. The types of food a person craves during especially emotional times depends on the individual.

Managing Cravings

Where there's a will, there's a way to overcome most food longings.

1. Be prepared:  Arming yourself with the right foods -- meaning, not the ones you typically crave but healthier options that can similarly satisfy -- is one good strategy. For instance, if you hanker for sweets, top nonfat plain Greek yogurt with fresh fruit and a touch of honey. If you're more of a salt buff, have a handful of nuts always at the ready. If you're keen on chocolate, give in, just keep it simple: One ounce of dark chocolate should do the trick.

2. Re-train taste buds: Are you used to super-salty or extremely sweet foods? You can help adjust taste bud preferences by slowly scaling back on added salt and added sugar over time. If your body isn't accustomed to as much, you won't need as much to satisfy a craving.

3. Walk it off: Research has found that exercise can help curb cravings. One study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise found that exercise decreased cravings for food in women, making them less likely to eat them.

4. Picture it: A 2011 study in Appetite found that replacing the mental image of a craved food (a doughnut) with an image of a favorite activity (like tennis) -- and drawing on all the senses, sounds and colors associated with that activity -- could help reduce the intensity of a craving.

5. Wait it out: Let 20 minutes go by to see if the craving passes. Doing this will also give you more time to make a healthier choice. Stress reduction techniques such as meditation, breathing or taking a hot bath -- or changing your environment by taking a walk or drinking some soothing tea -- can help a craving move on and move out.

Toby Amidor, MS, RD, CDN, is a registered dietitian and consultant who specializes in food safety and culinary nutrition. She is the author of The Greek Yogurt Kitchen: More Than 130 Delicious, Healthy Recipes for Every Meal of the Day.

Keep Reading

Next Up

Calling All Chocoholics: 5 Decadent Chocolate Desserts to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

Treat your sweet tooth to Food Network's most-indulgent chocolate desserts, including gooey cakes, over-the-top brownies and next-level cookies.

Reading List: The Gluten-Free Hype, Massive Egg Recall and Heart-Healthy Chocolate

In this week’s nutrition news: Rare heirloom veggies up for auction, gulf seafood finally being thoroughly tested and the gluten-free fad

6 Ways to Warm Up with Flavored Hot Chocolate

If the season's chill has you cozying up under a blanket, try one of these comforting cocoas to warm up from the inside out.

Make Your Own Chocolate-Covered Matzo

Make a fun Kosher-for-Passover treat: chocolate-covered matzo topped with almonds and sea salt.

Top Tips for Handling Chocolate, Plus the Richest Chocolate Cupcake Recipe

Valentine's Day will be extra sweet with tips from master chocolatier Fritz Knipschildt and his recipe for Double Chocolate Cupcakes.

Aisle by Aisle: Candy and Chocolates

With Halloween around the corner, here’s a rundown on some of the popular varieties and the best choices for those Halloween treat bags.

Your Chocolate Questions, Answered

Food Network stars answer your chocolate questions.

The Ultimate Guide to Chocolate for Baking (and Beyond)

Chocolate is available for purchase in dizzying variety: from bitter to sweet, white to dark, powders to chips, bars to bricks. To keep your head from spinning, here's a breakdown of what you'll encounter in the baking aisle.

5 Ways to Eat Chocolate for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner on Valentine's Day

Have an outside-the-candy-box Valentine's Day by incorporating chocolate into your breakfast, lunch and dinner.

This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

In this week’s nutrition news: Chocolate is good for more than just your heart, the war of the protein powders, and say buh-bye to this popular fad diet.

On TV

The Pioneer Woman

9:30am | 8:30c

The Pioneer Woman

1:30pm | 12:30c

Chopped

2pm | 1c

Chopped

3pm | 2c

Chopped

4pm | 3c

Chopped

5pm | 4c

Chopped

6pm | 5c

Chopped

7pm | 6c

Chopped

9pm | 8c
On Tonight
On Tonight

Chopped

10pm | 9c

Chopped

11pm | 10c

Chopped

12am | 11c

Chopped

1am | 12c

Chopped

2am | 1c

Food Network Apps

In the Kitchen

Get over 70,000 FN recipes on all your mobile devices.

Facebook Messenger

Ask our bot for recipes, meal ideas and daily food trivia.

Amazon Echo

Just say "Alexa, enable Food Network skill" to get started.