In Season: Honeydew

Honeydew melon is in season; find out how to choose one, the best ways to eat it, and why it's so good for you.

entwine, May 2011

Photo by: Yunhee Kim ©2011, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Yunhee Kim, 2011, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

This green melon is my 5-year old's hands-down favorite. I’ve never seen anyone so thrilled when a fruit’s in season—she devours fresh chunks at breakfast and bedtime snack. As a mom, I’m happy that she enjoys a food filled with good-for-you nutrients. Though as a food lover, I’m happy to report that there are many other ways to enjoy the heavenly taste of honeydew.

What, Where, & When?

Honeydew is part of the muskmelon family, along with cantaloupe and person melon. This family is also known as netted melon; their skin looks like its covered with a thick, rough netting. Honeydew is very aromatic, but if they’re picked too early they won’t become as sweet and flavorful.

The oval-shaped melon has a smooth, cream-colored rind and green-colored flesh that’s bursting with sweetness. You can also find gold and orange honeydew varieties, with flesh colors described by their name, though they’re not as easy to find. These melons range from 4 to 7 pounds in size.

This scrumptious melon is thought to have originated in Persia and was also prized years later by ancient Egyptians. Today honeydew is grown in Mexico, California, Arizona, and parts of the southwest and is most abundant from late summer through early fall.

Nutrition Facts

One cup of diced honeydew has 61 calories, 15 grams of carbs and 5% of your daily recommended dose of fiber and 51% of your daily recommended amount of vitamin C.   This melon also has potassium, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin K.

What To Do With Honeydew

Cool off on a hot summer day with freshly sliced honeydew or turn it into smoothies, juice, granita, sorbet or soup. Pair sweet honeydew with more savory food like prosciutto or chicken or add it to a veggie salad (honeydew-cucumber salad anyone?).

Selection and Storage Tips: Choose honeydew melons that are firm-but-not-hard and have a nice floral smell. Compare melons and select those that are heavier for its size—the heavier it is, the juicier it will be. Knock on a melon and listen for a deep, thick sound which will tell you if it’s ripe. Store whole melon at room temperature for 2 to 4 days. Once sliced, wrap and refrigerate for up to 5 days.

Recipes to try:
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