Are Collards the New Kale?

Collard greens are a hardy option in these delicious dishes.
COLLARD_GREENS_017.tif

COLLARD_GREENS_017.tif

Food Stylist: Jamie Kimm

Photo by: Antonis Achilleos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

Antonis Achilleos Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin 917 751 2855

If 2014 was the year of the kale, then 2015 is the year of the collard. The leafy green vegetable has seen a big marketing push from Whole Foods — and for good reason. Collards actually beat kale when it comes to nutrients: They pack more calcium and iron than kale. Plus, they contain 5 grams of fiber and 4 grams of protein per cup (cooked), compared with kale’s 3 and 2 grams, respectively.

So what can you do with collards? Happily, they’re just as versatile as kale. Try the hardy greens in these delicious dishes.

Collard Greens   (pictured above)

If you’re new to collards, start with this simple — yet delicious — recipe. Chopped collard greens are sauteed with onion before being simmered in chicken broth until tender. The result: melt-in-your mouth greens that are good for you too.

FN_Sunny Anderson Vegetarian Southern Style Collard Greens.tif

FN_Sunny Anderson Vegetarian Southern Style Collard Greens.tif

FN_Sunny Anderson Vegetarian Southern Style Collard Greens.tif

©2012, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

2012, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

This version of sauteed collard greens from Sunny Anderson takes a traditional dish to new heights. Red pepper flakes are added to help turn up the heat, while tossing in freshly chopped tomato before serving helps keep things fresh.

Food Network Kitchen's Healthy Braised Collard Greens and Butternut Squash for Healthy Vegetable Side Dishes as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Sweet butternut squash is the perfect complement to slightly bitter collards. In this easy recipe, the greens and squash are simmered together with garlic and — surprise! — ginger for an unexpected burst of flavor.

Food Network Kitchen's Collard Wrapped Bean Burritos For Bunless/Breadless Sandwiches As seen on Food Network

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Because collards are heartier than kale, they work great as a wrap. Plus, they’re a healthy stand-in for a flour tortilla. In this recipe, the greens are quickly steamed before being filled with rice, black beans and tomatoes and topped with a zesty cilantro-and-jalapeno-laced sauce.

Abigail Libers is a freelance writer and editor living in Brooklyn. She is also the creator and editor of notesonfatherhood.tumblr.com.

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