How to Make a Perfect Prime Rib Roast

These tips will ensure a juicy roast, whether you choose to sear it on the stove first or just cook it in the oven.

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Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Perfect Cooking

In a sense, prime rib roasts are even more forgiving than your average roast — with that aged meat and luscious marbling comes built-in flavor. But there are lots of ways to help it along, and the last thing you want to do is overcook such a pricey cut.

 

By Lesley Porcelli

Season Well

To every roast, there is a seasoning. Go old school, coaxing garlic slivers into poked holes, or give the meat an herb-salt crust. Really, the possibilities are endless.

Sear First

Ensure that deep-browned crust by searing the meat on the stovetop before it goes into the oven, and even cook the two halves of the roast separately.

Or Skip Searing

The meat will still get nice and browned on the outside roasting in the oven, and there’s a lovely simplicity to just popping the thing in. 

Don't Overdo It

Roasting time will vary, based on what temperature you’re roasting at, whether you’ve seared first and the weight of the roast. Follow these details in your recipe closely, and remove the roast when an instant-read thermometer plunged into the roast’s center registers 115 degrees F for medium-rare (taking into account resting time — see following pointer). 

Let It Rest

Don’t cut into the roast right out of the oven. Be sure to let it sit for about 20 minutes, as it will continue to cook and will redistribute the juices, rather than letting them all just run out. Try this method with Ree Drummond's Prime Rib with Rosemary Salt Crust.

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