Just the Facts: Winter Squash

Get the scoop on cooking winter squash from Food Network Magazine.

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Photo By: Kang Kim

Field Pumpkin

Halloween pumpkins are for carving, not eating: The flesh is stringy, but the seeds are delicious roasted.

Spaghetti Squash

The flesh separates into strands when this squash is roasted, so it can be served like pasta.

Delicata Squash

Also called sweet potato squash, this variety is thin-skinned, so you can eat the peel after roasting.

Acorn Squash

This fibrous squash can be bland, so season it liberally. No need to peel; the skin is edible.

Butternut Squash

This is a real crowd-pleaser: It's super flavorful and sweet. Use a vegetable peeler to remove the skin.

Sugar Pie Pumpkin

This looks like a small field pumpkin, but it's for cooking: The sweet flesh is perfect for pies.

Kabocha Squash

This Japanese squash becomes extra creamy when cooked, so it's great pureed for soup.

Calabaza Squash

Popular throughout Latin America, calabaza ("squash" in Spanish) tastes similar to butternut squash.

Red Kuri Squash

This onion-shaped squash, related to kabocha, is known for its chestnut-like flavor.

Hubbard Squash

This can be blue, green or orange on the outside. It's hard to peel, so roast it in chunks with the skin on.

Cheese Pumpkin

The name refers to its resemblance to a wheel of cheese, not to its flavor. It's sweet and great for pies.

Mini Pumpkin

This cutie is mainly decorative, though some varieties, like jack-be-littles, can be eaten.

Cinderella Pumpkin

This French heirloom variety gets its name from its resemblance to Cinderella's carriage. It's delicious when roasted whole, but give it lots of time.

Ornamental Gourds

These wild-looking rough-skinned squash come in many colors and shapes, but they aren't for eating: They're just decorative.

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Fall Produce Guide

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