Food Network Stars at Home

Take a look inside Marcela Valladolid's house in Southern California, Ina Garten's New York City apartment, Jose Garces' country getaway and Iron Chef Morimoto's Hawaiian hideout. 

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Linny Morris ©Linny Morris

Marcela in California

Marcela Valladolid, the spirited star of Mexican Made Easy and cohost of The Kitchen, always knew that she wanted to raise her son, Fausto, 10, in an old house. And a year ago, she found it — a 1912 Cape Cod–style home that sits on top of a hill in Chula Vista, CA. "I wanted the place to identify with Mexico without hitting all the stereotypes," she says. So she dreamed up a signature style she calls Euro-Mexican. "No serapes or sombreros. I wanted something more clean, crisp and subtle."

Much of Marcela's furniture, like the wood-backed sofa and tufted ottoman, was custom-made by her interior designer, Kari Arendsen of Intimate Living Interiors. But the house is also filled with thrift-store finds, like a bar cart she scored at the Salvation Army.

The home has no air conditioning, so Marcela leaves the windows open in the hallway between the living and dining rooms.

A portrait of Fausto on the beach hangs in the living room — it was painted by his grandmother. 

Marcela's dining room used to be a patio, hence the worn brick floors. She had the table and chairs custom-built. "But I never host a sit-down meal," she says. "I serve buffet or family style and just scatter chairs all over." On the wall: Talavera pottery, made in Puebla, Mexico. The pendant lights are from Pottery Barn.

Ina in the City

We've all seen Ina Garten's East Hampton home on TV, but few fans have seen this private hideaway in Manhattan: The one-bedroom apartment is Ina's escape whenever she has a long day of business meetings in the city. "I wanted it to feel like a refuge — a place for her to curl up and recharge," says architect Daniel Romualdez. To accomplish that, he balanced the high ceilings with a warm, inviting sitting area. You might think the soaring space would call for bigger furniture, Ina says, "but it was the opposite."

 

The 1925 apartment came with original leaded windows.

Many designers fill big spaces with oversize furniture, but Romualdez kept the chairs low and close together to make the living room feel cozier. He also added warm colors: "A green couch, yellow chairs, orange curtains, a purple ottoman — I never would have guessed it would all work!" Ina says.

Romualdez rearranged Ina's living room into two distinct spaces: the sitting area and an office, separated by a stone fireplace. 

Ina found the dining table and chairs at Axel Vervoordt in Antwerp, Belgium.

The bookshelf, from Axel Vervoordt, is one of Ina's favorite pieces. 

The walls of her bedroom are covered in ivory fabric. "It feels like a cocoon," Romualdez says. The bed linens are Frette and Pratesi, and the bedside floor lamp is Crate & Barrel.

Jose in the Country

Iron Chef Jose Garces spends most of the week in a modern loft in Philadelphia, overseeing his empire of 18 restaurants. But come Friday, he and his wife, Beatriz, and kids Olivia, 11, and Andres, 7, escape to this 1850 farmhouse on 40 acres in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. "I wanted a real environmental contrast," he says. He hired designer Gretchen Kubiak to get the house move-in ready and gave her access to a veritable goldmine: a warehouse full of furniture that he has collected over the years to outfit his restaurants.

Jose's two dining-room tables were originally a larger piece that his designer cut in half. The leather chairs, from Restoration Hardware, were customized with Ralph Lauren tweed.

A puffy-armed leather club chair from Anthropologie is one of Jose's favorite spots. "I love to sit here and watch football while eating my mother's empanadas," he says. 

Another favorite: a 2,000-square-foot deck with a full outdoor kitchen.

Garces had the wood paneling in the upstairs hallway painted white to make the space feel more open.

In the dining room, a portrait of a condor (an Ecuadorian symbol of health and power) sits on a custom-built buffet table along with a West Elm lamp and vase. "Now the house feels pretty complete," he says. "I'm ready to just enjoy it."

Morimoto's Favorite Spot

Despite appearances, Hawaii is not a vacation destination for Masaharu Morimoto. The Iron Chef has opened two restaurants there in the past few years — Morimoto Waikiki in 2010 and Morimoto Maui in 2013 — and he has been traveling from New York City to Hawaii every two months to check on them. He got tired of staying in hotels, so last year he started looking for an apartment, and he bought the first one he saw — for the view. The apartment has two small balconies that overlook the lush Manoa Valley. "You could have an ocean view, but after 6 p.m. it's nothing," he says. "The mountain view gives you something to look at all the time…Being here makes me happier."

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