Buttermilk Pound Cake

Total Time:
1 hr 50 min
Prep:
30 min
Inactive:
20 min
Cook:
1 hr

Yield:
10 to 12 servings
Level:
Easy

Ingredients
  • 12 ounces unsalted butter, cut into pieces and softened, plus 1 tablespoon
  • 16 ounces cake flour, plus 2 tablespoons
  • 16 ounces sugar
  • 4 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup whole buttermilk, room temperature
Directions

Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and heat to 375 degrees F.

Coat a 10-inch aluminum tube pan or 2 (9 by 5-inch) loaf pans with 1 tablespoon of butter and dust with 2 tablespoons of the flour.

Combine the remaining 12 ounces of butter and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer and cream for 6 minutes on medium speed, using the paddle attachment. Stop once to scrape down the sides of the bowl with a spatula. With the mixer running at lowest speed, add the eggs, 1 at a time, making sure each egg is fully incorporated before adding the next. Again stopping once to scrape down the sides of the bowl. This will take approximately 1 1/2 minutes. Add the vanilla and salt and beat on medium speed for 30 seconds.

With the mixer on the lowest speed add the flour in 3 installments, alternating with the buttermilk, beginning and ending with the flour, making sure each portion is fully incorporated before adding the next. After the final addition, beat the batter for 30 seconds on medium speed until almost smooth.

Scoop the batter into the prepared pan(s), dividing evenly if using 2 pans. Bake for 1 hour in a tube pan or in loaf pans, until the internal temperature reaches 210 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer. The crust will be golden brown and spring back when pressed, but the crack around the center will appear moist.

Remove the cake from the oven to a cooling rack for 10 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan(s) and cool on the rack for 10 minutes longer. Store the cake on the rack covered with a tea towel for up to 3 days.


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4.2 43
I've always thought of pound cake as a heavy, dry, dense loaf with minimal flavor, and I've never been interested in making one. But I had buttermilk to use up, and I figured if anyone could make pound cake worth the calories it would be the folks at Good Eats. The cake flour is genius in this; my cake came out soft, moist, fluffy, and buttery-good! I am a pound cake convert . item not reviewed by moderator and published
I was looking for a good pound cake to use for a wedding cake and after testing this one I'm pretty sure I've found it. I measured the batter before I baked it so I would know how many batches I would need, and in case anyone else wants to know the recipe made about 7 1/2 cups of batter when I made it, and I did measure by weight. item not reviewed by moderator and published
It would be better to have cup measurements not everyone has a scale I had to cook it much longer and at the bottom of the cake it looked as though it wasn't baked. I timed everything. But it might have been not measuring the cake flour. I did it by cups not a scale item not reviewed by moderator and published
As one earlier commented, it is a great way to use leftover buttermilk. But I had the same problem, I baked it at 375 for about 20 minutes when I checked it and it was already so brown. I reduced heat to 325 and continued baking. Should have read review. But still it's the best pound cake I believe I have ever made or eaten. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Amazing way to use up some buttermilk before it goes bad...it was great to be able to use my recently acquired kitchen scale too. The cake was moist and didn't have the expected tangy flavor...the kid loves taking this with them as a snack to camp, way better than a Lil Debbie : item not reviewed by moderator and published
Every oven is different. If the recipe calls to bake at 375 you may need to bake at 350 test how your oven works. If they tell you to weigh the ingredients then by all means weigh them. Cup measurement is different from scale measurement, don't over work the flour that will cause your cake to be hard and too dense, beating your flour for more than 3 min can ruin your cake. All of your ingredients must be at room temp (not straight out of the refrigerator this recipe is the best.... item not reviewed by moderator and published
This cake is great. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I loved it sooo good!!!! better with the glaze item not reviewed by moderator and published
This cake is fabulous like the other writer said if you don't follow the directions correctly don't blame the recipe. Also invest in a food thermometer. All ovens are not calibrated the same. 210 degrees is a perfect cake . I made it in several vessels and they all were perfection! YUM! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I posted a poor review prior but tried this again, this time WEIGHING the ingredients. This cake is FABULOUS. Not too sweet, very compact, tons of flavor. If the reason it doesn't turn out is because of measuring the ingredients incorrectly, don't fault the recipe. Now I want to eat this! item not reviewed by moderator and published
8 ounces are in a cup item not reviewed by moderator and published
No, 8 oz of water in a liquid cup. The weight of a 1-cup dry measure depends on the material in the cup. I promise, 1-cup of ball bearings does not weigh the same as 1-cup of feathers. AP flour is approx. 4 oz per cup. item not reviewed by moderator and published

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