Orange Marmalade

Total Time:
25 hr 45 min
Prep:
45 min
Inactive:
24 hr
Cook:
1 hr

Yield:
10 (8-ounce) jars
Level:
Intermediate

Ingredients
  • 1 3/4 pounds oranges, 4 to 5 medium
  • 1 lemon, zest finely grated and juiced
  • 6 cups water
  • 3 pounds plus 12 ounces sugar
  • Special Equipment: 10 (8-ounce) canning jars with rings and lids, funnel, tongs, ladle, and 12-quart pot
Directions
Watch how to make this recipe

Wash the oranges and lemon thoroughly. Cut the oranges into 1/8-inch slices using a mandoline, removing the seeds as you go. Stack the orange slices and cut them into quarters. Place the oranges into an 8-quart stainless steel pot. Add the lemon zest and juice and the water to the pot, set over high heat and bring to a boil, approximately 10 minutes. Once boiling, reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer and cook, stirring frequently, for 40 minutes or until the fruit is very soft.

While the fruit is cooking, fill a large pot (at least 12-quart) 3/4 full with water, set over high heat and bring to a boil. Place 10 (8-ounce) jars and rings, canning funnel, ladle, and tongs into the boiling water and make sure the water covers the jars by at least an inch. Boil for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat, add the lids and leave everything in the pot until the marmalade is ready.

Meanwhile, place a small plate in the freezer. Increase the heat under the orange mixture to return to full boil. Add the sugar and stir the mixture continually, until it reaches 222 to 223 degrees F on a deep-fry or candy thermometer, and darkens in color, approximately 15 to 20 minutes. You may need to adjust the heat in order to prevent boil over. Test the readiness of the marmalade by placing a teaspoon of the mixture onto the chilled plate and allowing it to sit for 30 seconds. Tilt the plate. The mixture should be a soft gel that moves slightly. If mixture is thin and runs easily, it is not ready.

Remove jars from the water and drain on a clean towel. Place a canning funnel onto the top of 1 of the jars and ladle in the marmalade just to below the bottom of the threads of the jar. Repeat until all of the mixture has been used. The amount of marmalade may vary by 1 to 2 jars. Wipe the rims and threads of the jars with a moist paper towel and top each with a lid. Place a ring on each jar and tighten.

Return the jars to the pot with boiling water, being certain that they don't touch the bottom of the pot or each other. (If you don't have a jar rack, try a round cake rack, or metal mesh basket. Even a folded kitchen towel on the pot bottom will do in a pinch.) Add additional water if necessary to cover the jars by at least an inch. Boil for 10 minutes. Using canning tongs, carefully remove the jars from the water, place in a cool dry place and allow to sit at room temperature for at least 24 hours before opening. Once open, store in the refrigerator. Unopened marmalade will last for up to 6 months.


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4.4 77
Used- 6 blood oranges, 6 cups water, 3 1/2 cups sugar, lemon peel &amp; juice....followed all directions &amp; came out delicious!<div>Not canning-made 4 8oz jars-putting in fridge &amp; will eat them :)</div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
amazing and oh so tasty. This will take longer to cook down to soften the oranges and get to the 220-222 jelly stage than listed, but I'm sure my kitchen stove isn't the same that Alton has anyway. Stick with it. This recipe is amazing, generally easy (as jam goes) and is well worth the patience needed to make such a great treat. Enjoy. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I read many of the under-five reviews to ascertain any problems I might encounter before I began. I used 7 oranges, because the oranges at my grocer were all the same size, so what is medium, large, small? I interpreted a rapid simmer as a slow bowl, and stirring often (according to the recipe) allows quicker evaporation of the excess liquid. I used a deep stock pot to prevent boiling over. My batch 6 pints of perfectly-jelled, tasty marmalade. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I had no problem with the flavor. But, the consistency was quite either syrupy or thick like honey, so I think next time I"ll add pectin from the grocery store to make the marmalade more jelly like. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Took me a lot longer than 15-20 minutes to get the temp to 222 on a candy thermometer after adding the sugar. I personally HATE it when recipe times are mis-represented, especially when it is boiling sugar I have to stand and watch/stir/watch/stir/watch/stir...... for upwards of 45 minutes. But otherwise I am happy with the finished product, set up nicely. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This marmalade recipe worked well for me. I did have to almost double the cooking time to get to temp. I like that I don't have to soak overnight and can complete canning in a few hours. I've made it twice! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I haven't actually made this yet (working on it now), but if it doesn't set, you can rebatch with pectin, or use it as a drink syrup for hot drinks. It's good by itself with hot water (almost a tea) or in hot tea. It would also be good on pound cake! (For what it's worth, 12oz of orange drink syrup is about $12 at the asian grocery store...) item not reviewed by moderator and published
I followed the directions perfectly and I got orange soup, what a waste of time and money. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Is 3.12 pounds of sugar 7 1/2 cups? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Great marmalade. We followed the directions to a T, but ours didn't set upeither. We unjarred it all and re-cooked, adding a packet of sure jell. Turned out perfectly after that and everyone who we have given some to loves it. Only 5 more batches to go.... item not reviewed by moderator and published
ez item not reviewed by moderator and published
So, when exaclty do you put the sugar in. Call me stupid but I read the instruction through 4 times and never did I see where the sugar goes into the mix. Being someone who has never made even simple jelly or jam on my own Ive no clue.. item not reviewed by moderator and published
THANKS SO MUCH ALOHA item not reviewed by moderator and published
A wonderful mild marmalade. Store bought marmalade is often bitter, but this is a sweet confection of a preserve. Try it on croissant, fresh bread, or as a sweetener in your tea. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have made this recipe twice. I have been told by several people that it is the best marmalade they ever had. Fantastic recipe Thanks Alton! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Made this for teacher's gifts this year. Recipe is easy and extremely tasty. Everyone raves about how good it is. item not reviewed by moderator and published
It is super sweet, I will probably cut back on the sugar the next time. But spot on the # of Jars. I doubled the recipe and was able to fill 20 8oz jars. These will be Christmas presents. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used 2 1/2 cups of sugar and it finished with just the right amount of bitter/sweet. Canned jams, jellies and preserves (and many other canned products) should last a year on the pantry shelf, if unopened. item not reviewed by moderator and published
For taste, I give it 5 stars. The recipe needs slight clarification. Could you please state the sugar in cups. I converted it, using wiki. Which suggested about 7 cups. That seemed an awful lot to me, so I used 3.5 cups. My marmalade is lovely. Do you cover the pot when cooking the fruit? I did cover it during the first cooking sequence, and left it semi covered after adding the sugar. Also, I do not own a candy/deep fry thermometer, so I just boiled the mixture at my stove&amp;#39;s highest possible setting (gas. I had no problem getting the marmalade to &amp;#39;gel&amp;#39;. I used four 16 ounce ball jars, filling them just under the thread line, which on the ball jars there is a little lip in the glass there. This would be about 14 ounces. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have been experimenting with lemon marmalade (with prefect results with my meyer lemon tree lemons, and my friend asked me to help her make that as well as an orange marmalade. I have not made this recipe yet, but I&amp;#39;ll tell you from my lemon experience that the seeds are necessary to get the pectin into the final product so it sets! And a 24 hr soak is helpful to reduce bitterness and soften the peel. So I&amp;#39;m confused about the total time being over 24 hrs without the soak being mentioned because it looks like that&amp;#39;s what that was for. Anyway, take the advice of Chef #864049 below, and you&amp;#39;ll not need to add pectin. I buy little spice cheesecloth bags for the seeds. Don&amp;#39;t neglect to squeeze the pectin out of the bag as you remove it from the mixture (before adding the sugar. And I&amp;#39;ll use a thermometer to get the final product to 220. item not reviewed by moderator and published
i just made this as written not actually knowing if i actually like orange marmalade i just got to say that now i know i like it, it set up beautifully and i had no problems what so ever item not reviewed by moderator and published
This marmalade is delicious and is easier to prepare than most marmalade recipes. The first time I made this, it wouldn't set and I had to add pectin. I made another batch today, and it set just fine without additional pectin, but I made this major alteration: After juicing the lemon, I cut it up and put it and it's seeds in cheesecloth and boiled it with the fruit. When the fruit was very soft, I turned off the stove, and let the fruit sit overnight. I resumed my jam-making in the morning. I brought the mixture back to a boil and added the sugar. Once it reached a boil, it was ready in about 30 min. This time, however, I let it boil a bit too much. I would have liked it to be a bit looser. I think the tree has enough fruit on it for one more batch. Third time's the charm! By the way, I used Moro oranges. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is my second year to make Alton Brown's Orange Marmalade and my friends are always eager to receive a jar. I actually use Blood Oranges and La. Hamlin Sweet Oranges. The first batch of Blood orange is light in color, but when the oranges start to turn red inside the marmalade ends up a beautiful rust color. I too found you have to cook it about 25-30 minutes to be perfect. I have made 9 batches of 1/2 pint and also 12 oz jars and it disappears fast. Thanks Alton Brown! item not reviewed by moderator and published
My friends beg me for this. It only makes about 9 cups (sometimes only 8. It is beautiful and makes me proud to give away. I love it, too. The trick is to not rush it. Do just as recipe says. I do slice my oranges with my Cuisinart. Saves a lot of time. Take out and the cut in the required quarter slices. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This mixture would not get above 218 degrees, even after a hard boil for almost an hour. I used a Wolf stove, a professional Magnalite pot, a Taylor digital thermometer and a Taylor candy dial thermometer. I have never had an Alton Brown recipe not work (he's in my top 2 favs so am sorry to leave a bad review, but what happened? Perhaps if Mr. Brown could leave a "fix" for when the mixture will not increase in temperature? It never did set. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This was a perfect way to process extra oranges! I did have a problem with gelling though. probably not enough pectin in the lemons. I had to resort to powered pectin. 1/4C water, 1/4C sugar, 2 Tbs. lemon juice, 4 tsp. powered pectin per quart of marmalade. Mix and boil then add to marmalade mixture. Reboil for 1 minute. All fixed! This was super easy and the first time I have made marmalade. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This was wonderful! I plan on making this again for christmas gifts this year. Thank you Alton! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I tried Alton's recipe as is on a whim after catching the episode. My first batch was an non-setting failure, but delicious as an ice cream topping. I attempted a second batch today by combining this recipe with Ina Garten's recipe and had great success. Here's what I did: ~I used all ingredients as listed in Alton's recipe ~After slicing, I cut the oranges into thinner sections ~I simmered just the water, lemon zest/juice and leftover uncut rind, and oranges for the 40 recommended min ~I removed the lemon rind, added the sugar until it dissolved, then turned off the heat, covered the pan and let it sit on the stove overnight ~In the morning I brought the pan back to a slow simmer for about 1 hr ~I turned it up to boil and reach 225 degrees, then followed Alton's tip on checking for doneness ~I only needed to turn the heat up to medium to get it boiling hot enough and it took about 20 minutes until it was ready to jar item not reviewed by moderator and published
Easier than the recipe from the Kerr canning book, and much sweeter. Needed to cook twice as long, as other reviewers stated. The grated lemon rind did not work out. It floated on top of the jam, and stuck to the side of the pot while cooking. It took 2-3 days to firm up sufficiently after processing. My other recipe says to let the fruit and water set overnight before cooking. This method turned out firmer, and more bitter, than AB's recipe. I think I'll try this recipe again, and set the fruit and water for a couple of hours, to try to get more pectin and a little bitterness. item not reviewed by moderator and published
First time making marmalade and it tasted amazingly good. Was a little too sweet and also took almost an hour to "set" - I heated it a couple of degrees above 223 and was worried. Other than that, the instructions were easy to follow and everything went as expected. item not reviewed by moderator and published
1 Alton needs to adjust his recipe. Have made this twice and each time it took at least 2X the suggested cooking time. 2 Made with the food processor on the "mandolin" setting. So easy! 3 Pulled the seeds out and put them in a mesh bag to cook with the oranges. Seeds add pectin. 4 Didn't "quarter" the oranges slices and the marmalade turned out great. Can't even tell they weren't quartered. 5 When you use a food processor, you can get big chunks of orange skin that may have to be run through again or cut manually. 6 Do not use over-mature fruit or it won't set. I threw in a cut up lemon to cook with the oranges to add extra pectin. 7 Great tasting - made with blood oranges and it was delicious! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Great! I felt it was a little too sweet (for me personally so I added some extra lemon &amp; orange zest, as well as a pinch of salt. And yes, it did take a little longer then the recommended 20 minutes to "set up". I also used 4 cups of water instead of the 6 that the recipe calls for... overall though it was great! Cannot wait to give it as gifts!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
The taste is out of this world. Bursting with orange flavor and very sweet. I followed the recipe exactly (I weighed the ingredients and used a candy thermometer but it turned out too runny. It's a shame because it makes 10-11 jars worth. I had to dump the 11 jars of runny marmalade down the drain. I'm doing to try it again but just use 4 cups of water instead of 6 (another reviewer suggested it. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I had never tasted marmalade before, but was looking for an "ooh!" homemade Christmas gift, and several of the people on my list pay like $10 a jar for marmalade and fancy jams, so I thought I'd give it a shot. I'm not wild about the flavor, but marmalade fanciers like it. It seemed just a touch too sweet. I added a little sack of cloves and some cinnamon sticks during the first stage and fished them out prior to added the sugar. It set beautifully. A little too well, I think, but I cooked it without benefit of a candy thermometer. The plate trick is very useful if you don't have a thermometer, just make sure your plate is cold enough! You'll need at least an additional 20 minutes cook time, more if you have a lousy old electric stove like I did. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have a feeling this would have come out much better if I had used 2 cups less water, as one other reader suggested. Never set after hours of boiling, then adding more sugar, adding a whole package of pectin... don't know how that could possibly fail. Also made a huge mess as it boiled over the pot and onto the stovetop. I did double the recipe and add a package of fresh cranberries though. Should have read the reviews saying not to do that first... item not reviewed by moderator and published
What a yummy way to use up citrus. I used a combination of oranges and tangerines (2/3 to 1/3 and also doubled the recipe. It seemed to take forever to reach the correct temperature but I am so glad I did not give up. It jelled perfectly. Next time I think I will experiment by adding a few bright green limes. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Stupendous! Followed the recipe exactly and it still took about 20 minutes longer to reach the correct temp but the ending consistency is perfect and the flavor can't be beat. Will never buy marmalade again! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Excellent! Made recipe exactly as Alton wrote it, but just as mentioned in the Albuquerque reviewer, it took about 20 minutes longer to reach soft ball stage, due to the altitude. I'm making a 2nd batch tomorrow. From start to finish, it took me 2 hrs. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Alton does it again; this was very easy to make. We added two cinnamom sticks, four allspice beads and four whole cloves, it added another dimension to it. We also added a shot of cointreau at the end per recommendation of another reviewer; a lovely, elegant touch. Delicious! item not reviewed by moderator and published
oooooo yum! It was great! I added some PC cinnamon plus to it - nutmeg, ginger, cinnamon, orange peel. In Albuquerque we're over a mile in altitude so it always takes me longer to get a good temp reading, but it only took about 45 minutes. Heaven on a chocolate chip scone. Love Alton! Will make it for holiday presents this year. I'll start in the summer when all the farmers markets get those blood oranges. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This recipe came out great! We added rosemary to a couple of jars, cinnamon to one, cardomom to another and and a chili spice batch to boot! The only difference from the recipe is we had it on the stove longer as it took awhile for it to thicken up. Yummy! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Fabulous! I made two batches already with some home grown Washington Navel Oranges. Reading one of the other reviews, I too used a food processor to cut the oranges. It worked like a charm, quick and easy. Thanks Alton. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Haven't tried it yet, but no one in all of the recipes I used warned me that oranges/orange juice gets violent when its boiled to near caramelizing, I came close to halving the recipe as I needed other oranges for other recipes, but it still tasted great as it burned my tongue before I canned it but as I caramelized it. Very simple, very good, apparently. I'm sure I'll love it tomorrow when I get to try it. Then maybe I'll decide the small, sporadic burns were worth it. Warning: wear long sleeves and gloves when making this recipe...consider safety glasses-I had one spot of orange land right behind my right ear-that one really hurt. Other than the revenge of the oranges, its a great recipe;-). item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is a great recipe. I used my food processor to slice the fruit and it took less time to prepare and accomplished the same result as the mandolin. But very easy and very tasty. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Tastes great. Took a lot longer to bring to jell point. I used juice and blood oranges. Beautiful colors. Could have affected cook time. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This recipe worked perfectly for me. Really delicious. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Great recipe! Followed the directions exactly on the first batch and it came out exactly as expected. My husband loves it - it's just the right amount of bitter for a marmalade. I made a second batch using 50/50 chopped pineapple and oranges. I added a thumb-sized piece of ginger (cut into thirds and removed when the cooking process was complete. Aside from that, followed the directions exactly and it turned out SO SO well. Very tasty, indeed. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Great and easy recipe ! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Ooh, this is good marmalade. It's so hard to find a recipe that tastes like English Marmalade with bitterness intact. I used all the pith, not just the outer skin. I couldn't find my mandoline, so I ran the whole oranges and lemon through the standard slicer blade in my food processor, then sliced into strips. A couple of notes: This did take a good while to reach a temp of 223 degrees, well over 45 minutes after bringing back to a boil after adding sugar. I did cut down a tiny bit on the sugar, so that might be why. The jam needs to boil hard to get to the setting point, and has a tendency to boil over on the stove. To keep the bubbles down, add a small pat of butter while cooking. Do yourself a favor and add a dash of good scotch, Contreau or Grande Marnier just before jarring. So good. My new go to jam recipe. item not reviewed by moderator and published
What I love about this recipe is that most marmalade recipes are multi-day affairs, and you can do this all in one. That being said, the time it takes is SHOCKINGLY understated. We got started at about 4pm and finished up after 11pm. We approximately quadrupled the recipe, so that was part of it, but plan on taking a long time and stirring CONSTANTLY once the sugar is added so it doesn't burn. Also, I would try not to use thick-skinned oranges. We cooked them for about twice as long as suggested, but they are still a little tough in the final result. Solid recipe for a traditional marmalade, though, and probably a good base for experimentation! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I am making Christmas presents this year, and I added a new twist to this marmalade. I substituted Satsumas for the oranges and added freshly grated horseradish, turned out lovely. Great for dipping with shrimp or meats. Also a goes great with cheese and crackers! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I made this for a Christmas present. Great basic recipe! I didn't make it as written (of course! lol... I used more oranges, and I used a little grated ginger and no lemon. The most helpful part was about testing with the chilled plate. It took a lot longer than stated, because I used more oranges and more water, so having that test was very helpful. Came out great! Thanks, Mr. Brown! item not reviewed by moderator and published
WonderPen: The jars would be fine in the refridgerator for about as long as you would keep any jar of opened jam. However, the canning process (boiling water etc) is what pushes the air out of the jar to create a seal so that you can safely store the jam for longer periods of time. I wouldn't store unproccessed jam outside of the fridge or freezer because you will most likely get mold or at the very worst, botulism. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I intended to use a large jar to store all the orange marmalade. As stated, I placed the jar in the boiling water. I recalled that glass could crack due to sudden temperature changes and the jar I use did break (praying it would not break did not work). Smaller jars, as stated in the recipe, might be a better idea. The marmalade itself was too bitter for me. It was sweet with a bitter aftertaste.I have never had marmalade, so I had no idea what to expect. The oranges I used must have made quite a difference or I cooked the marmalade incorrectly. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Thanks Yubbasmama. Yes, just as I thought and will refrigerate. Often maken freezer jam so will treat as same. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is a good recipe, though after trying it a few times /have a lot of oranges in my garden/, I found following: - 6 cups of water is too much, I use about 4 - the amount of sugar required is too much, I use about 1 kg /2,2 lb/ and the jam is plenty sweet for my taste and it gels well - the initial cooking period before adding sugar /40 min in the original recipe/ is too short, I cook it for at least an hour before the pieces of peel in the jam get soft enough. Otherwise, it makes great marmalade and all my friends and family love it. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I was wonder if blood oranges could be used. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Hope this helps: Check a reliable source like the standard, the Ball canning book b4 messing w amt of sugar.Never never change sugar unless absolutely positive that it will not affect the ratio in finished product - sugar is the preservative. You'll never see rock candy mold! Use tarter fruit, or add grapefruit or lemon. Jars should be bone dry, do towards end. Setting requires pectin + acid. Lemon is for acidy, not just taste. Double the lemon if using sweet orange: satsumas, mandarins, etc. Also, the older the fruit, the less pectin. Pectin comes mostly from the seeds and white pith in the center so Alton got by with not juicing, measuring the juice and adding sugar to each cup of juice, and suspending the seeds and pith wrapped in cheesecloth by just boiling everything but the seeds. Altitude makes a diff both in making and how long to process. Pour out runny jam and reboil with commercial pectin added, then proceed. You should let the marmalade sit before putting into jars just until a skin forms on top, then stir, so the peel will be distributed through the whole jar. Do not process on a towel, not enuf space for water to circulate under and over jars . item not reviewed by moderator and published
I was lucky that my local grocer had seville oranges (at the end of March) so I went ahead and bought the gear. The mandoline didn't work well (straight type blade - I'm going to return it for a V-type blade). So after cutting all the oranges by hand and following the steps (minus 1/3 the sugar and +1 lemon) I found that the temperature didn't get above 216 F. I decided that it was the melted sugar content that was too low and that it was needed to get the higher boiling point so I added a cup at a time until I was able to get to 222.5 F. That required almost the entire measure of sugar. I am waiting to see how it comes out for consistency but would like to know if there is a lower sugar recipe that will still set up properly, as I like my marmalade a little tarter. item not reviewed by moderator and published
well my biggest questions an hoping someone will help me on this one?!?!?!?! on the fourth paragraph its saying to remove jars from water and drain on a clean towels!?!?!?!?!? -----&gt; so my question is if the jars need to be completly dry, or just drain dry? i dont know if i explain my self or not??!?!?!? please help? thanks item not reviewed by moderator and published
I just made this and it is sooooo good but I used really sweet oranges so the jam came out really sweet. Next time I will taste them first to make sure I need all the sugar. Everyone is loving how sweet it is except me...tastes divine though...now I need to go make scones or good eats english muffins for it! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Where'd they come up with a 6 month shelf life? Jams and jellies are good for at least a year (and beyond, but we won't go there). And to everyone else: DON'T DOUBLE JAM RECIPES! Sorry for shouting, but its very important (and marmalade is jam). You can make up more, just cook it up in separate batches. When you double a recipe with pectin you change the formula and usually it doesn't set right. I know you're thinking "well I was pretty good at algebra, I'll just muliply everything x3 and we'll be fine". Just don't. You'll be sorry. Because it's not algebra. Jam doesn't know algebra. It knows f-ing calculus and will kick your butt. Learn from my mistakes, and have fun canning! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I wasn't really planning on making this recipe, until I discovered that my local gourmet grocer had Seville oranges in stock, so I thought, why not ($1 each!). The grocer said that Sevilles are the best for marmalade because of their high pectin, and maybe that is the problem that others are having with getting it to gel, they might be using an orange with lower pectin. I doubled the recipe, no problems with that like someone else was having. Sevilles have A LOT of seeds so that made it difficult and they gummed up the mandolin a lot as well. I also had a hard time getting it to the proper temperature, I could get 216 and then it seemed to plateau, but after like 45 minutes of cooking, it finally went to 219 and I stopped. I wonder if this was because I'm at a higher altitude and it hit its boiling point, or maybe there was too much water in it and that lowered it boiling point, but in the end it turned out really well, it is just the right consistence and it ended up producing more than expected. I had a total of 24 cups. The flavor is great and looks good too. Thanks. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Followed recipe exactly, but took almost three hours of cooking to get the cold plate test to work. Even then, it never really set up firmly. And the long cooking killed most of the citrus flavor. Very disappointing. item not reviewed by moderator and published
In the recipe it said to use a stainless steel pot and I don't have one. Can I make this recipe with a regular pot? Thank you. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Btw, loved your story about your mother Josefina! Very sweet:) item not reviewed by moderator and published
I made this recipe today for the orange marmalade by Alton Brown. Followed the recipe completely. It is wonderful. I will be sure and make it again. It will be great for the new year. Took some to my friends. They were so excited. It really looks wonderful too. Thanks again. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I was reading everyones comments and I noticed that someone doubled the recipe. Others did a single or smaller batch and had great success. If you double the recipe you have to double the time it takes to cook. The water does evaporate away in the initial boiling so when you have a large pot that is tall and cylindrical the water does not evaporate quickly from it. Try using a shallower and more open pot to have the water evaporate, I think Alton touched on this subject of different size stock pots when he did a soup expedition. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This was my first time ever making a jelly/jam or marmalade, so I did not know what to expect and the directions really did not say much. I followed the directions nervously (adding my own touch here and there) and it turned out great! For all of you other first timers, the water/orange mixture (before you add the sugar) will greatly reduce. Well, it did for me, and it turned out just fine after adding the sugar. This was a good, easy recipe, and I plan on making more - much more - especially since I have an orange tree and the oranges are in season (and ripe) now. BTW my "own touch" was chopping the orange peel into bite size pieces and adding more of it. I also chopped the orange flesh smaller and added more of it too. It came out great: tastes great, looks great (great consistency) and is easy to eat. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Well... I had a lot of oranges and decided to "double" the recipe (Including the sugar). My marmalade never completely jelled (even after two weeks). I wound up with several jars of an orange marmalade type syrup. This was just in time for Thanksgiving however. I used a few of the jars to make a fantastic glaze for my ham and I added some to my candied yams, which were absolutely delicious, so all is not lost. I would like to know, however, why my marmalade never jelled. I even after added pectin to hopefully help it to jell? Did I have too much sugar? When you "double" a recipe do you only double some things and not others? Alton, HELP!!! C. Cameron Yonkers, NY item not reviewed by moderator and published
I made marmalade for the first time, so I made a small amount, I changed the ingrdients a little, did not have lemons, so I used the juice of one lime, one large navel orange, 3 cups of water and 2 cups of sugar, followed the exact directions. turned out excellent, much better than anything you buy at the supermarket. this makes one pint, I am sure I will be making it again, but next time I will make a lot more, to shar with freinds and family. Thanks Alton. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This came out perfect, just like on the show. My only $.02 would be to warn you that if you use a smooth-top electric range (like I do), do not try to double the recipe! My range didn't have the power to push a double batch past about 215F, and I ended up having to basically split the recipe back up into it's original size to hit the desired temp. Maybe next time I'll try the auxiliary burner on my grill. Ok, one other comment: next time I do this I will jar in quart jars. Pints are fine for most jams/jellies, but the way my marmalade came out so thick and chunky, you will empty an entire pint jar over just a few pieces of toast! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used a meyer lemon and sour garden oranges and couldn't have been happier with the results! item not reviewed by moderator and published
When I saw this show my mouth melts. I wanted to make this recipe because I always have in my memory that my mom prepared candy of the peeling of lemon or oranges. I know this is a marmalade and use the whole fruit. I wanted to taste it anyway, even if I know that my memories are with only the peel. After read the review with the recipe for make this with the peel, a feel so grateful to this person that I wanted to write this review to give thanks for the variation of the recipe. I will prepared both ways, because I know they are great. My mom did it for many years, she use a big pot of copper and cooked in an oven created in a whole under the soil. Made it in big amounts because many people was waiting to have some. I never was with her when she made this. She passed away and is missed a lot. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I enjoyed making and eating this (yes I know it's been only a day since it aired). But you don't need to use whole oranges for marmalade - just the peel will do. So you can peel and eat the oranges, or use what's left from juicing them. Don't take the pith off- the maligned pith is where a lot of pectin comes from. Just cut the peel in 1-inch stripes and then chop them across finely. What type of oranges? Even though it's barely February I wasn't able to find any Seville oranges, so I used 2 other types: basic navel oranges (peel only), and for another batch Cara Cara oranges (whole) - which beside being a little more tart which is good for the marmalade, also gave a nice pink color to the final product. Thirdly, I find that a final temperature of 222F is a bit too high - the marmalade is difficult to spread. I settled on a final point of 218-219 which gave a much more manageable product. So here's my variation for peel only: - peel from 4 oranges, chopped as above in thin ribbons - boil in 3 cups water on low for 40 minutes - add 26 oz sugar - boil on med-low for 15-20 minutes until temp is 218-219F or in the absence of a thermometer, put a blob of the liquid on a cold plate and separate it in two smaller blobs, close together; if they stay separated and don't coalesce, you're done. Canning as in the original recipe. I didn't bother, this stuff never lasts more than a few days in my fridge. :) item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used this receipe but instead of lemon juice I used candied ginger and omit the lemon juice. Add a teaspoon to your tea. item not reviewed by moderator and published
love your recipe any i watch good eats and ive tryed a lot of your recipe there great ever time thanks larry item not reviewed by moderator and published
Same here, just got done re-processing mine as well, hoping for a good outcome!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Meanwhile, place a small plate in the freezer. Increase the heat under the orange mixture to return to full boil. Add the sugar and stir the mixture continually, until it reaches 222 to 223 degrees F on a deep-fry or candy thermometer, and darkens in color, approximately 15 to 20 minutes. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Paragraph 3 states to add the sugar. item not reviewed by moderator and published
My12 jars did not gel. Going to addpectin and recook tomorrow item not reviewed by moderator and published

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Grilling and Summer How-Tos