Basic Sourdough Bread

Total Time:
1 hr 36 min
Prep:
30 min
Inactive:
1 min
Cook:
1 hr 5 min

Level:
Intermediate

Ingredients
Directions

In an electric mixer with the dough hook, combine the flour, starter and salt, and knead until it no longer sticks to the sides or bottom of the mixing bowl.

Place a lightly oiled bowl, turning to coat. Cover with plastic wrap and let dough rise in a warm, draft-free place until doubled in size, 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle lightly with flour and knead gently, removing any large air bubbles. Knead into a small circle, then shape into a tight ball, pinching the seams together underneath. Place on a well-floured board or baking peel, seam-side down. Cover with a kitchen towels and let rest until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Preheat a baking stone, if available, on the bottom rack of an oven at 400 degrees F. With a sharp, serrated knife, cut a large "X" or cross-hatch pattern into the top of the dough.

Spray lightly with a mister and transfer to the baking stone (or place on a heavy baking sheet lightly dusted with cornmeal) and bake until golden brown and the bread sounds hollow when thumped on the bottom, about 60 minutes. (Sourdough should have a darker crust than other breads, so leave in the oven 5 minutes after you think it is done.)

Remove the loaf from the oven and let cool on a wire rack for at least 30 minutes before serving.

Basic Sourdough Starter:

In a large bowl, combine the water, yeast, and sugar. Let sit until the yeast becomes foamy, about 5 minutes. (If the yeast does not foam, discard the mixture and begin again with a new yeast.)

Add the flour and stir vigorously to work air into the mixture. Cover with a towel let rest in a warm, draft-free place (an oven with its pilot light or light bulb turned on works well) for 8 to12 hours. (The mixture should become very bubbly.) Use immediately or cover loosely with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.

Preserving the Starter: Each time you remove a portion of the starter for a recipe, reserve at least 1/4 cup and replace the amount you have taken out with equal amounts of flour and water.

For example, if you remove 1 cup of starter, you must replace it with 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of warm water. Whisk these ingredients into the starter until blended but not completely smooth, cover loosely, and return to the refrigerator.

Also, the starter must be maintained by feeding it every few days. Refresh by removing 1 cup of the starter (give to a friend or discard it) and adding 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of warm water. Whisk until blended but not smooth. Cover loosely and return to the refrigerator.

If you plan to be away longer than a week, freeze the starter in a sterilized, airtight freezer container. Thaw the starter 2 days before you plan to bake with it. Refresh as indicated above with 1 cup each of flour and warm water. Cover and leave at room temperature 12 hours or overnight before using.

CAUTION: Never keep your starter tightly closed! The gasses expelled by the yeast will build up pressure and may cause the container (such as a glass jar) to burst!

Yield: 5 to 6 cups Prep time: 10 minutes Inactive prep time: 12 hours


CATEGORIES:
View All

Cooking Tips
More Recipes and Ideas
YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE
3.6 70
Here are my notes to this recipe: <div>--the starter made a little over twice as much as the recipe calls for, so I'm halving it next time, since I don't feel like storing it and I don't want to waste so much flour</div><div>--the bread cooked in about 40 minutes on my baking stone, so the advice to cook it for at least an hour would have dried the heck out of it</div><div>--I let it rise longer than instructed, maybe two hours the first rise, at least an hour the second rise</div><div>--I sprayed water into the oven at least three times to keep it from drying out</div><div>--it smells amazing, I can't wait for it to cool enough to eat!</div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
Very good. Best bread I have ever made. Everyone loved it. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I added a bit of buttermilk to my starter with the commercial yeast (gah Victoria!) fed it for a week and made the bread today. I agree with others, it was too dry to mix the dough using my bread machine (OMG also not traditional) so I added about a 1/2 c of water. As my starter was only a week old I also added about a half tsp. of dry commercial yeast. I set the bread machine on "dough" and let it go. At the end of the cycle (first raise) I took it out, formed it in to balls and put it in the oven covered loosely in plastic wrap with a pan of water on the next rack. Leaving the oven light on (makes it just warm enough) for about 90 minutes they doubled in size. Scored with hash marks, brushed with egg wash, sprinkled with Maldon salt and baked at 400F until brown and hollow sounding. (not an hour...more like 30 minutes) BAM! I have great sourdough bowls for stews. I guess that's why this recipe is ranked "intermediate" as you do need to modify as you go. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I'm gonna have to try this one again. I may have done something wrong on the 1st go. Not sure how they kill bulls in a slaughter house, BUT... if you hit a bull in the head with this bread he's at least goin' down for the count! The crust came out super hard! The inside has a good texture though. Wonder if 400° is a bit on the high side? Round 2 comin' up tomorrow! item not reviewed by moderator and published
This sourdough bread sounds super easy to make especially with this easy way of making sourdough starter. I can't wait to taste my first homemade sourdough bread. It's hard to believe that some people claim this is so hard, or takes years to master, when the instructions make it look so easy. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've been looking for an easy, real sourdough recipe. This is EXACTLY what I need! Thanks! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used it with my wild yeast starter and this recipe worked just fine. Longer rising time of course, but it still worked out. (Hush, Victoria. Quit being such a purist.) Oh, and I added some herbs--parsley, garlic, rosemary. I could've eaten the dough it smelled so delicious. Highly recommend it! item not reviewed by moderator and published
So there is someone on here going ape crazy about it not being true sourdough bread. Fair enough assessment (except I don't care what it is called as long as it tastes good and I could care less about the science of yeast), but if you are looking for easy to find ingredients to make a delicious bread, then this is the recipe to use. I made a loaf and my family ate very last bit of it in 5 minutes (even the child that doesn't like bread threw down). I estimate that for all the listed items, this loaf cost about 75 cents, which is a great affordable compliment to a meal if you are on a budget. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Wow! This Sourdough bread recipe REALLY worked well for me. I'm going to add this to my regular recipe lists. I can make sourdough bread so easily now&gt; Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/basic-sourdough-bread-recipe.html?oc=linkback item not reviewed by moderator and published
Good bread! item not reviewed by moderator and published
How is this a "sourdough" bread recipe when the "starter" calls for commercial yeast?????????? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Now this is soo good. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Made this starter, it went nuts on me, rose and developed and still is, baked a sour dough bread, had to use 2and a half cups starter. But everyone loved it, I'm gluten free, will try wholewheat one today. Awesome having a ready made starter item not reviewed by moderator and published
I always was scared to bake sourdough bread but not anymore. Very easy recipe, good for the beginners. Baked 45 min instead of 60. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This was my first time making sourdough bread ever. (I've only made whole wheat breads and honey wheat in the bread machine before). I'm very new to baking breads :) I found this recipe a week after making a starter and nurturing it for a week. The bread came out a little too crispy, will need to bake it for a bit shorter time maybe 45min? next time. Will be making it again for sure. item not reviewed by moderator and published
worst sourdough recipe ive ever had. dont make this. didnt rise, no flavor and hard as a rock. this recipe is absolutely terrrrribbbbblllllleeeeeee item not reviewed by moderator and published
had to add more water, it did not come together like dough should when I followed the recipe. then it turned out very dense &amp; bland. won't make this again item not reviewed by moderator and published
Curious how most of these reviews are not very praiseworthy and yet everyone still gives multiple stars. I had spent a week making a starter from scratch. Followed his recipe and the long and short of it is, the bread tho tasty was extremely dense and did not have the typical sourdough look. Read an article in Mother Earth News and realized that to make a proper sourdough bread there is a lot more kneading and "exercising/stretching" of the dough with additional rest times to allow the glutens to properly interact. Going to make another loaf today and follow a more traditional recipe. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I am a novice at bread making, but I had my own starter, so I didn't use the one in the recipe. I did use the exact proportions in the recipe, but my ingredients were too dry to come together. Did anyone else have this problem?? I added about half a cup of water. We'll see what happens! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Kneaded in the food processor, it produced the stickiest dough I've ever made. Second rising on a Silpat pad. Baked for 30 min at 400, electric oven. It rose nicely, nice crust, but badly needs salt. Too bland, and my sourdough starter is extremely sour, but this needs salt. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I loved the simplicity of this recipe. However I agree that amounts and times are not exaact. My dough was far too dry &amp; stiff, so adding a bit more sourdough and a small amount of water brought it to a better consistency. The time for the dough to rise probably depends on your sourdough - it took mine about 3 hours to double - but that could be due to the dryer consistency of the dough. Lastly, I didn't cook it as long as recommended - only about 45 minutes - but what a delight it turned out to be. The crust was crunchy - not tough and the inside was delicious. I suggest that you use common sense with this recipe and remember sourdough is not an exact science - it will differ with each starter, the type of flour, elevation, humidity, etc. item not reviewed by moderator and published
My guy who is sensitive to gluten can eat this tasty bread! I made the starter with slow acting yeast and whole wheat flour (non-enriched. I love it and will enjoy it getting more sour over time! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I LOVE this recipe! But two things about it, first of all, only bake it for 30 minutes. Second, the first time you make this, it will NOT taste like sour dough, but as you use your starter more and more, it will get sourer and sourer item not reviewed by moderator and published
I set out to learn how to make sourdough bread. This recipe is simple and through other research I have done, true to the traditional sourdoughs. Some recipes have starter and yeast in the recipe, which is not the traditional way. I have found that sourdough takes longer to rise and the creation of starter is an ongoing process. The bread tastes better as time goes on with the aging of the starter. I have just baked my 6th loaf.....6 weeks into my bread adventure. It's almost like a chemistry project......pretty neat, I think. item not reviewed by moderator and published
...um... but this isn't sourdough. I admit that it was the absolute best french bread I ever cooked and one the the most delicious sweet french breads I've ever tasted. But it's not sourdough. To be sourdough, the bread has to be ... duh ... sour. No starter that takes only 8 hours can be called sour. To make sourdough starter you must leave this started on the counter for the better part of the week until it is (like me! full of bacteria, slightly alcoholic, and emiting a pungent sour odor. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This was my first attempt at sourdough, and it turned out so soft on the inside, and crunchy on the outside. I even added garlic and herbs to one loaf and it was delish! I will use this recipe again for sure, as a matter of fact my starter is sitting in the oven right now. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Easy recipe but don't cook it for 60 minutes; I took mine out of the preheated oven at about 35 minutes. Perfect! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have to agree with the vanngogh. Even tho this was my first attempt at making sourdough bread, my breads always come out tasty. This was a complete failure. Mine came out as hard as a rock after following the directions. I'm not even sure I can cut into it! I'm going to throw my starter out and try the frugal gourmet's way. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This was the most disgusting sourdough bread I have ever made. A total waste of perfect starter. Came out like a hockey puck after following his directions explicitly. I should have known. Stick to every thing else you do Emeril. You are not a sourdough bread baker! item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is the best sourdough recipe out there! I've made it several times (no bread machine, come on people, old fashion way is always better!and keep getting requests for me to make it again or for the starter.. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Love this recipe! It was so easy, although it does take some patience to let the starter make its magic and then again to let the dough rise. My daughter, although she HATES to cook, loves sourdough bread and this recipe actually had her in the kitchen making it with me! I read the earlier comments about adding additional H2O. Instead, I increased the amount of starter to 2 cups instead of 1 1/2. With the added liquid, I found that I needed a smidge more flour (approx an 1/8-1/4 of a cup. I used AP flour instead of bread flour and found no issues with the exchange and instead of using the mixer with the dough hooks, I used my handy dandy food processor on pulse with the dough paddle. Again no issues with the exchange. As this was my first go at homemade bread, I was a little nervous but it was a great way to spend one on one time with my teenager and we had a nice little reward to show for our efforts! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I tryed this yesterday. I'm sorry to say it was a brick. I will not try again is alot of work not to be able to eat. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I usually love everything that Emeril makes, but this bread was a loser. I used my own starter, and needed to add a lot of extra water. Still, the dough didn't rise adequately even after letting it sit overnight. The finished product was more like a dense scone with a very tough crust. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Bread turned out excellent, BUT you lose 1 star due to it needing water even if you have a thin starter which I did (used my own starter made with fresh cake yeast. I probably used 1/4 cup lukewarm, but if your starter is thick you would definitely need more in order to incorporate 2 cups of flour. I bake bread ALL the time just never baked a sourdough bread. Great recipe with a little added water. DO NOT incorporate all your flour at once. This makes a small but beautiful loaf. Next time I will make double the recipe. Temp and time are pretty much right on 50 -60 minutes. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This recipe is awful unless you are trying to bake brick weapons. There is no such thing as a no-knead bread. I have tried to use it several times before finding something better. Always came out very very hard the crust is almost inedible- no matter how much I babied it. This recipe might work with an added half hour of kneading but I give up trying. :( item not reviewed by moderator and published
Yum. Turned out beautifully. Crispy crust and chewy middle. I must be careful not to eat the whole loaf now. It is a pretty looking loaf! item not reviewed by moderator and published
loved this recipe! Would make it again and again. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This recipe is terrific, and verrrry forgiving. I forgotten to start my sourdough bread for a family dinner, so I tweaked this one to make it work in a hurry. I used my mature starter, added 1/2 tsp yeast, &amp; a touch of honey to speed up the process. I let it rise for about 15 min (beside a space heater while my oven preheated. It kept rising once it was in the oven, and turned out beautifully &amp; perfectly yummy in 50 minutes!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
was easy to make the house smells wonderful and it's yummy item not reviewed by moderator and published
I had to add water to the dough as my sourdough is thick. It was a small loaf so I thought an hour and 5 minutes was too long to bake, but I did it anyway. The bread is soft on the inside and crusty on the outside. It is delicious! I think it is the best sourdough bread I have baked since I bought my sourdough. I will bake again. item not reviewed by moderator and published
A good, basic sourdough. The whole house smells great while this is baking. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Like corbratsche, I add the liquid slowly, I have made this twice, and it always came out delicious. Besides measurements being precise, don't over knead the bread. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Delicious! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've seen a lot of reviews of this recipe complaining about dryness in the resulting bread. There are two hard and fast rules about baking bread...1. Your measurements must be precise. 2. You never, ever dump the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients all at one time. Never. Ever. (DISCLAIMER: probably doesn't apply to bread machines. I baked up a loaf of this today. I got a great crust and moist interior. Start with a cup of flour added to the starter to get the ball rolling, then added the second cup a little at a time, checking after each addition for elasticity. You can always tighten up a sticky dough with a little more flour; it's really hard to take flour out once you've added too much. I also recommend putting the shaped loaf on the stone or baking sheet for the second rise...moving the loaf after the second rise can cause it to fall. Good result aside, I'm taking one star away from Emeril for not mentioning the "no dumping everything at once" rule. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Love, love love this recipe! I was intimidated by "bread" and especially "sourdough" bread... There is no reason to be! My family is really behind the whole starter process! We even named our starter (recommended on another website dedicated to bread so that we won't forget to feed him! We love Fi-dough, the Sourdough!! The texture of my first sourdough bread was perfect. The flavor was good, and I am really looking forward to Fi-dough maturing and giving the baked goods a more "sour" taste. Thank you, Emeril, for sharing!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I'm new to the bread making scene and this recipe was perfect! I'm lucky to have a 70+ year old starter! After a few times working the bread by hand I decided to try it in the bread machine. It came out OK, but I have found the sourdough has the best flavor when I do the first cycle in the bread machine (mix/knead/rise) and finish it off by hand. I have been shaping my bread into french baguettes with (/ / /) top slices and letting the dough do a slow rise in the fridge overnight (about 12 hours). I also knead just a little bit of flour into the dough before the second rise. I think the additional flour and longer rise time gives the bread a better flavor because the starter is still at work. Like those below I reduced the bake time to about 25 minutes... Delish! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Rather dry, even after adding extra starter. Tossed it out. item not reviewed by moderator and published
@locowoods_12406796, I was having the same problem. Decrease the baking time - 25 minutes works great for me. I brush the crust with olive oil, instead of water, for a softer crust. You can let it rise, then refrigerate overnight, let it rise again the next day - it will be a slower rise - you may be happier with the texture, etc. Hope this helps. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I need help. I have made this 3 times now, and results are terrible! Crust needs a chainsaw to cut thru it and the bread is dense, dense dense, even though it does double in size before I bake it. Everyone else has given great reviews, so I know it is me not the recipe!! I am new to bread baking - what am I doing wrong? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I'm new to bread making.This was awesome bread but not at all sour. item not reviewed by moderator and published
quick and excellent for soup bowls item not reviewed by moderator and published
My dough came out a little dry, so I just added a couple more tablespoons of starter and it had the right consistancy. This is a nice recipe to build off of to make your own truely tasty creations. item not reviewed by moderator and published
We have a sourdough starter that is 2 1/2 years old and when used with this recipe it produced the best sourdough bread we've baked so far. Emeril gets most of the credit for this basic and easy recipe, but we can't underestimate the hard work of our famous one-celled San Franciscian friends that live in a mason jar in our fridge. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Great for beginners! Gave the recipe to my nonbaking friend and some starter, she loved it. I left my starter for a couple of days and got a nice tangy dense bread that went well with the cioppino I made. Lois Okeechobee, Fl. item not reviewed by moderator and published
It is no real sourdough, but something helpful for absolute bread-beginners. item not reviewed by moderator and published
The starter takes a while to get truly sour, it's best to let it age. Also, I think freezing is a bad idea, as it can kill the yeast beasties which give the sour dough it's flavor, I've left my starter unfed for a couple of weeks in the fridge with no ill effects. If your bread is taking a long time to rise, then your starter probably isn't active enough yet, the first time I made sour dough bread my starter wasn't nearly active enough and my loaf came out dense and not so sour. Give your starter a little more time to ferment, sour dough is something that needs to be planned for, it's not something you can start and finish in a day. Lastly, name your starter, mine's named "Bob", it is a living organism (well a collection of yeast,) and make feeding it part of your routine...you'll find more uses for it as you go (I make pancakes and a sour dough apple bread with mine.) item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used this recipe and my loaf came out nicely. Make sure you are measuring your flour correctly. If you have a scale, for one cup it should weigh around 130 grams. Too much flour and you will have a very dense loaf. The first time you use the starter it won't be very sour....over time it will develop the extra tangy sourdough bread. Also, try making the dough, let rest for a few hours at room temperature, then overnight. Shape and bake the dough the next day. It should develop a more tangy sourdough this way. Bread baking takes time to master. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Today is the second time I've tried making this bread. I followed the recipe exactly, but my bread is turning out really dense and dry. I had to wait for twice the time in the recipe in order for it to rise, and the idea of pinching the seam together when you shape it into a ball is a joke because it's way too dry and not nearly sticky enough to hold the seam. I've made many other bread recipes that were a lot better. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I like this starter because it's so easy, however, it took about 2-3 weeks to get sour. I just kept baking bread every other day, so the starter was being fed, and eventually, it has gotten that sourdough flavor. item not reviewed by moderator and published
We were not very impressed with the results we got from this recipie. There was not the nice sour flavor we were expecting from Sour Dough, nor the course, larger crumb size. It made an acceptable loaf, but needed a lot more salt. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have never made sour dough bread before, the crust was very heavy and thick. The starter went wild. The taste was like any white bread I have made before. If you are looking for true sour dough I don't recoment this recipe. item not reviewed by moderator and published
and this bread really didn't. I even went so far as to continue to feed to starter for over a week to enhance the flavor and it didn't really improve at all. item not reviewed by moderator and published
San Francisco sourdough flavor can't be gotten starting with baking yeast. www.sourdo.com will sell yeast that will produce a starter that will produce good tasting sourdough breadt. Sourdough bakery is a cross between gardening and baking. You have to nurture the starter...those yeasts are living plants. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Wonderful!!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
This bread was great and really easy to make. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Bread was fine, but not quite like the fresh sourdough that you get in San Fransisco item not reviewed by moderator and published
yummy! item not reviewed by moderator and published
to work with item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've now tried this 3 ways - once in my bread machine (results were poor), once in the bread machine on dough cycle (a little better, but still not great) and finally the good old-fashioned way. It turned out great. Good rise, chewy/crunchy crust and soft interior. I'll be making again. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Not the most interesting sourdough bread, but it's crusty and an easy recipe. item not reviewed by moderator and published
If the bread tastes sour, it is because the starter (while crowding out ANY wild yeast that try to grow in it) may permit the growth of lactobacillus. Lactobacillus is the organism that we use to make yogurt. But this rapid-rise bread will not have the complex flavor of a real sourdough bread. item not reviewed by moderator and published
CAN WE PLEASE START USING THE WORD "SOURDOUGH" ACCURATELY? There are lots and lots of ways to make a bread taste sour. You could add yogurt to the dough. You could add pineapple juice. You could add vinegar if you want (it won't kill the yeast). But please don't claim to have made a "sourdough" bread. Baking a real sourdough bread is incredibly hard to do because wild yeast is unpredictable. A re item not reviewed by moderator and published
Chill out lady. For the basic majority, this is sourdough bread. Spend your energy on more productive things. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Wow! This Sourdough bread recipe REALLY worked well for me. I'm going to add this to my regular recipe lists. I can make sourdough bread so easily now&gt; item not reviewed by moderator and published
Get a life lady item not reviewed by moderator and published
I agree with Victoria. item not reviewed by moderator and published
But it's not "sourdough." item not reviewed by moderator and published
A true sourdough starter would not behave like that. Real sourdough starter uses wild yeast which reproduces VERY SLOWLY and that slowness is what gives real sourdough bread its amazing flavor. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Oh I know that Victoria, I still love this recipe, family loved it too. Wild yeast will be next experiment. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Of course it's easy: it's NOT A SOURDOUGH RECIPE. Sourdough starter does NOT include yeast you can see. It takes weeks to grow a real sourdough starter, using only wild yeast. item not reviewed by moderator and published
This recipe is NOT a "sourdough" recipe and will not yield the incredible flavor of a real sourdough bread. Go to sourdough.com if you want to learn about what sourdough actually is (hint: no commercial dry yeast involved). item not reviewed by moderator and published
Probably because you used a real starter. This commercial yeast "sourdough starter" provided for in this recipe will generate a rapid-rising bread. item not reviewed by moderator and published
You can actually make a "no knead" sourdough bread using a very high hydration dough (like, 80% hydration -- but you have to understand baker's math to make this, and a scale), and you can just use Reinhardt's stretch and fold method. You don't have to knead. I get better results with a very wet dough and the stretch and fold approach. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Thanks for your detailed review. I'm going to throw my expectations for "perfection" out the window and follow your wise, experienced advice. Hoping to get your result. item not reviewed by moderator and published
It's simple because it's not sourdough. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Sourdough bread does not use "slow acting yeast." Sourdough bread uses wild yeast, which reproduces about 1,000x more slowly that the "slow acting yeast" that you buy in the store. Sourdough bread rises VERY SLOWLY and that's one of the things that makes it so tasty. This recipe is not a sourdough recipe. Why does everyone keep using that word? item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is not a sourdough recipe. Go to sourdough.com to learn how to make sourdough bread. This "starter" use commercial yeast and sugar and will consist entirely of rapid-gorwing yeast (which will dramatically outcompete any wild yeast present in the medium). item not reviewed by moderator and published
THANK YOU item not reviewed by moderator and published
IT WAS NOT YOUR FIRST ATTEMPT AT SOURDOUGH. You can call this recipe whatever you want but it's not sourdough. Gah. Using the word "sourdough" as Lagasse does here makes me so angry. Ive been baking for decades, and have devoted hundred of hours to mastering the difficult art of true sourdough bread. This recipe is an insult to my efforts. item not reviewed by moderator and published
It was not your first attempt at baking sourdough because this is not sourdough item not reviewed by moderator and published
A real sourdough starter won't work with this recipe because if you look at Emeril's "starter" it uses commercial yeast and SUGAR and will create a rapid-rise bread bearing no resemblance to the incredibly slow, delicate rise of a true sourdough bread. item not reviewed by moderator and published
No, it's not the "best sourdough recipe out there." It's not a sourdough recipe AT ALL. Have you ever tried to make a real sourdough bread without using ANY dry yeast that you bought at the store? It's really hard -- but the results are worth it. item not reviewed by moderator and published
It didn't work because you used a real starter and Emeril's starter is commercial yeast, flour, SUGAR (!!!!!) and water. This is not a sourdough bread. There will be no wild yeast in it whatsoever. item not reviewed by moderator and published

Not what you're looking for? Try:

Sourdough Bread Stuffing

Recipe courtesy of Dave Lieberman