How to Season Cast Iron Skillets

Level:
Easy
Ingredients
Directions

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Wash new cast iron cookware with warm soapy water and promptly towel dry. Generously coat cookware with vegetable shortening. Bake in oven for 1 hour.

Remove skillet from oven and rub again to redistribute oil. Place in the oven and bake again for 1 hour. Remove from oven. Wipe excess oil off with paper towels, then allow to cool before storing. Store in a cool, dry place, with paper towels below and on top of skillet to protect shelves and skillet.


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3.3 20
I purchased an iron skillet that was seasoned to company standards. I followed Emeril instructions, however, I seasoned with bacon fat and Emeril's Essence. Awesome! Just make sure you follow the rules of water and no soapy water for clean up. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Thank you my mother in laws skillet looks beautiful!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Good thorough information that was simple to follow and not overly explanitory. item not reviewed by moderator and published
After doing a bit of research, the general consensus is flaxseed oil is the best oil to season a pan with. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Perfect a thing of the past that granny always did and no longer around to ask. Thank you, Thank you and Thank you, again item not reviewed by moderator and published
Emeril Rocks! That said, all I use in the kitchen is iron (except saucepans and a Crock Pot. I used Crisco the first few years, but it always left the pan sticky. Crisco also wears off easily. Now I use good old fashioned lard, It holds up better and never gets sticky. Every couple of weeks I'll give them the once over with a light coat of lard for good measure. I also do my seasoning in my gas grill so the smell stays outside. I use my big 16" frying pan for crispy oven baked "home fries" and I'll wipe a very light coat each time I put it under the broiler. That keeps it seasoned all year long and the tators don't have a greasy taste or texture. (makes a great deep dish pizza item not reviewed by moderator and published
I use Crisco Shortning and you are not supposed to use a lot, a very very thin coat. Wipe it on and wipe it off. Then heat the pan upside down so that if there is any excess it will drip down instead of bake into goop on the pan. When cooking, everything sticks if the pan is not seasoned properly. Seasoning also preventy rust. If there is rust use steel wool to remove any and all rust. Then season to prevent any more rust. You should do the seasoning process several times for the best seasoning. Also a tip when cleaing after use.... wipe out with a warm wash cloth and dry, then place back in the oven or on the burned for a short time to let all the water that you may have missed evaporate. If you use your cast iron often then you won't have to season it as much. Do not store food in the cast iron cookware and it is not recommended to boil water in the cookware. If you buy a new peirce of cast iron cookware (skillett, kitchen oven, dutch over, ect...) there is generally a protective coating applied. That does not season the cast iron. It is just a generic coating that the manufacturing industry puts on there. To remove it: Wash your new cast iron in hot soapy water. Do not leave it submersed in the water or leave water standing in it. Wash it throughly and with steel wool to get that coating off. It the coating is left on it will not season properly. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I recommend heading to cookingincastiron.com for slightly more detailed instructions. The guy has a video podcast that actually shows you a great method for seasoning and re-seasoning cast iron. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Dito that last comment....how do you clean and season old cast iron? And how do you know when it needs to be re-seasoned? item not reviewed by moderator and published
How do you season & clean old, rusty cast iron? It was my grandmothers and she had a set of them (6, 8, & 9 1/2"). All of them had rust in them. Donna Cincinnati, OH 10-02-2008 item not reviewed by moderator and published

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