Jaeger Schnitzel

Total Time:
45 min
Prep:
25 min
Cook:
20 min

Yield:
4 servings
Level:
Easy

Ingredients
  • 20 ounces beef or veal or venison leg, tri tip or shoulder, cut into 1/2-inch
  • Salt and pepper
  • Flour, for dredging
  • 3 ounces olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped carrot
  • 1/4 cup chopped celery
  • Bouquet garni (thyme, bay leaf, parsley)
  • 2 cups red wine
  • 1 cup veal stock
  • 1 ounce butter
  • 2 ounces thick cut bacon, diced
  • 6 ounces pearl onions, boiled
  • 2 cups wild mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons minced parsley leaves
  • Noodles or mashed potatoes, as an accompaniment
Directions

Season the meat with salt and pepper, dip the pieces in the flour, and shake off excess.

In a heavy saute pan, heat 2 ounces of olive oil over high heat. Sear both sides of the meat until golden. Remove meat and set aside.

Add the onion, carrot, celery, and bouquet garni. Saute for 1 minute. Deglaze with wine and continue to cook until reduced by half. Add 3/4-cup of the stock and return meat to pan, lower to a simmer, and cook until meat is tender. Transfer meat to a plate and keep warm. Strain sauce. Reserve.

In another saute pan, heat the remaining 1 ounce oil and butter. Saute the bacon until golden. Add the pearl onions and mushrooms and continue to saute until golden. Add to the sauce. Place the meat back into the sauce and simmer for 5 minutes.

To serve, divide schnitzel into 4 portions on center of heated plates. Pour the sauce with mushrooms and bacon on top. Sprinkle with minced parsley. Serve with noodles or mashed potatoes.


CATEGORIES:
View All

More Recipes and Ideas
YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE
Loading review filters...
BROWSE REVIEWS BY KEYWORD

    14 Reviews
    513
    0/1000 characters
    Your Rating:
    (Required)
    Sort by: 
    Another untested ghost-written "celebrity" recipe. No chef or cook is ever going to take meat out of a pan and set it aside twice before finishing it in a busy restaurant kitchen. The ingredients don't all get used (where does the rest of the veal stock go?), there is not enough sauce after everything gets cooked down, and the 20 minute estimate for the cooking time is never going to happen. ie this recipe is the brainchild of someone, but it was never actually prepared. 
    Having said all that the recipe is fine and the sauce has good depth of flavor. It wasn't a keeper for me though as it is a lot of prep and work for just pretty good.
    Loved this. I served with poppy seed spaetzle fried in butter and steamed brocoli. Made with boneless porkchops which I beat with a mallet. Added a lot more pepper, black and white and some garlic. Otherwise, same as recipe. Would definitely make again.
     
     When I was in Georgia, I went to a german restaurant and had jaeger schnitzel,but was veal. They fried the meat so it had a delicious crispy crust and then put a creamy mushroom sauce over it last minute and served with spaetzle. Boy, would I love to have that recipe, too.
    This receipe is fantastic! It took me more like 60 minutes total to fix using thin bone-in porkchops, not including the time it took me to make homemade spaetzle.
     
     I couldn't find any fresh thyme today, so I substituted a sprig of fresh rosemary instead. I also used portabello & porcini mushrooms. I also like my gravy a bit on the thicker side so I added 1 tablespoon of wet cornstarch.
     
     My wife who is not a big mushroom eater, said it was absolutely wonderful, nice and earthy but not overly mushroom earthy. Even my kids ate the sauce without complaining.
     
     I used the FN spaetle receipe, adding 1/4 tsp of cayenne pepper and 1/4 tsp of white pepper, and instead of water, I use chicken stock. After I boil them, then I fry them in fresh garlic and butter until golden. My kids go ape over these, and they were absolutely wonderful with the Jager sauce.
     
     Yum!!!!
     
    I made the recipe with pork chops and omitted the bacon to lower the fat content. It came out excellent. I served it with Spaetzle and braised red cabbage. The whole dinner companion loved it. I highly recommend it.
     
     I ate a Jaegerschnitzel in some German inn in Catskills a few years ago, and the taste stayed with me since then. I was looking for a good recipe for quite a while, and this one comes quite close to the culinary heaven experience.
     
    My husband is German and remembers his step-mother's kitchen smelling just like this! It was wonderful. I made spaetzle and it was a fabulous meal. Thanks, Wolfgang!
    I too am from Deutschland (Germany) from a town on the Mosel river called Merl near Zell-Kaimt (not Zell am-See) Wolfgang is a brilliant artist and in this way this recipe is an interpretation of a classic. As you can see be reading below there are many variations.
     Where I am from it is a pork cut that is breaded fried with a thick mushroom cream sauce served with pommes (french fries) and salat. I have gone to other regions and had it as veal (never as steak). Like anywhere the local menu depends much on how rich the area is, what the history is, who they have as neighbors and that sort of thing.
     Here is the Definition as is known.
     
     Online Etymology Dictionary - Cite This Source - Share This
     schnitzel
     veal cutlet, 1854, from Ger. Schnitzel "cutlet," lit. "a slice," from Schnitz "a cut, slice" (+ -el, dim. suffix), from schnitzen "to carve," frequentative of schneiden "to cut," from O.H.G. snidan, cognate with O.E. sni?an "to cut," from P.Gmc. *snithanan.
     
     I have prepared this recipe and though it is good as a recipe it isnt what I was raised on. I have never been to Passau itself but I have been to the east (Buyern-Munchen ist miene Lieblingsfu?ball-Mannschaft) but i dont think that I remember what there schnitzel was like... so it is possible that that close to another border it would be different. My recomendation?... try them all and decide what you like. (and now when I go on vacation i will have to go east for a day and do some research :) )
    I am from Passau and we cooked this at home often. This is just the way I remember it! Sehr Gut! Sehr Smekt!
     
     As for Mr. Anonymous, Jager does mean Hunter, but Schnitzel is a meat dish. Jaeger is the manner in which the dish is prepared.. In this case it was venison originally because deer were common in the countryside in earlier years. As they became less numerous, other forms of meat were substituted, such as veal, pork and beef.
     
     Regardless of the meat, Jaeger Schnitzel is Wunderbar and a lovely dish and this particular recipe is authentic.
    Prepared this for a dinner party of 8 a couple of weeks ago. One of the guests raised in Germany. Used a German Fried Potato Recipe found on another site.
    Loosely translated, Jaeger Schnitzel means "Schnitzel as the Hunter." Somehow, the mighty hunter stalking and shooting the wiley milk-fed calf in a box or even the swift-footed beef cow doesn't seem correct. In fact, every Jaeger Schnitzel I ever had in Germany consisted of a Pork Schnitzel or the original wild boar schnitzel
    Very tastey! I didn't have pearl onions so I used what I had on hand - red onions. I used pork steak that I pounded thin instead of veal. My kids loved this dinner. We served it with home made spetzel. Perfect German dish.
    This recipe was very easy and very flavorful. I had to use chicken stock instead of veal stock, but it still tasted great. I highly recommend it.
    Recipe is amazing, and absolutely fun to make! Very tasty; highlighted by several layers of flavor, as all are very distinct in this succulent dish!
    This recipe was great. I followed it except I like My Snitzel crisp, so I never returned it to the gravy... I spooned the gravy on top of the meat and served it with potato dumplings.
    This was easy to make and my whole family enjoyed it.
    Flag as inappropriate

    Thank you! your flag was submitted.

    Not what you're looking for? Try:

    Veal Chop Holstein Schnitzel

    Recipe courtesy of Anne Burrell