Japanese Chicken, Water Chestnut, and Scallion Yakitori

Total Time:
1 hr 55 min
Prep:
35 min
Cook:
1 hr 20 min

Yield:
6 servings
Level:
Intermediate

Ingredients
  • For the marinade:
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup dry Sherry
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon minced, peeled fresh ginger
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • For the skewers:
  • 8 skinless boneless chicken thighs, cut into 36 (1 1/2-inch) pieces
  • 2 bunches scallions (about 10), the white and pale green parts cut into 24 (1 1/2-inch) lengths
  • 24 canned whole water chestnuts, rinsed and drained
  • Lemon wedges, as needed
  • Mustard, preferably Chinese-style, as needed
Directions

Equipment: 12 wooden skewers for skewering the chicken and vegetables

To make the marinade: In a saucepan whisk together the soy sauce, Sherry, sugar, ginger, and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Bring the mixture to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer for 5 minutes. Let the marinade cool. (The marinade can be made in advance, and refrigerated for up to 2 weeks.)

To make the skewers: On each skewer alternate 3 pieces of chicken with 2 scallion lengths and 2 water chestnuts. (Skewer the water chestnuts carefully so they don't split; and begin and end with the chicken.) Arrange the skewers in a large shallow baking dish and pour the marinade over the chicken and vegetables. Marinate at room temperature, turning once, for 30 minutes. (The skewers can be marinated up to overnight.)

Arrange an oven rack about 4 inches from the broiler and preheat.

Arrange the skewers on a foil-lined baking sheet, reserving the marinade. Broil the skewers, basting occasionally for the first 6 minutes. Continue broil, turning occasionally, until the chicken is just cooked through, about 10 minutes. Discard any remaining marinade. Transfer the skewers to a platter and serve with the lemon wedges and mustard.

Contains Raw Eggs: The Food Network Kitchen suggest caution in consuming raw and lightly cooked eggs due to the slight risk of salmonella or other food-borne illness. To reduce this risk, we recommend you use only fresh, properly refrigerated, clean grade A or AA eggs with intact shells, and avoid contact between the yolks or whites and the shell. For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served, use shell eggs that have been treated to destroy salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method.


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