Ossobuco

Total Time:
5 hr 15 min
Prep:
45 min
Cook:
4 hr 30 min

Yield:
6 serving
Level:
Intermediate

Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup lightly packed Italian parsley leaves
  • 1/2 cup lightly packed fresh basil leaves
  • 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary leaves or 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary, crumbled
  • 1 tablespoon fresh marjoram leaves or 1 teaspoon dried marjoram, crumbled
  • 6 (2 1/2-inch thick) veal shanks measuring about 4 inches in diameter
  • 3/4 cup unsifted all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 large whole clove garlic, peeled and halved
  • 1 large Spanish onion, peeled and cut into 1 1/2 inch chunks
  • 1 medium rib celery, trimmed and cut into 1-inch lengths
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch lengths
  • 6 (3-inch) strips lemon zest, removed with a vegetable peeler
  • 2 medium ripe tomatoes, cored and cut into slim wedges (no need to peel)
  • 2 cups dry white wine, such as Pinot Grigio
  • Gremolata:
  • 2 medium whole cloves garlic, halved
  • 5 (3-inch) strips lemon zest, removed with a vegetable peeler
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup lightly packed Italian parsley leaves, rinsed in cool water and wrung as dry as possible in paper toweling
Directions

For the ossobuco: Churn the parsley, basil, and fresh marjoram and rosemary, if using, in a food processor fitted with the metal chopping blade 5 seconds. Scrape the work bowl and churn 2 to 3 seconds more until moderately fine. Scrape into a large fine sieve, then rinse the work bowl and blade directly over the sieve so that all stray bits of herbs fall into it. Rinse the herbs well under cool running water, transfer to paper toweling, and wring dry. Set aside.

Dredge the veal shanks well on all sides in the flour, shaking off the excess. Heat the butter and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large, heavy nonreactive kettle over high heat for 2 minutes.

Add 1/2 the shanks, brown well on all sides, and lift to paper toweling to drain. Add the remaining tablespoon olive oil to the kettle, heat 1 minute, then add the remaining shanks, and brown the same way. Transfer to paper toweling to drain and slide the kettle off the heat. Sprinkle the shanks well on both sides with the salt and pepper.

Add the garlic to the processor and mince fine by churning 4 to 5 seconds. Scrape the work bowl well, add the 1/2 the onion, the dried marjoram and rosemary, if using, and pulse 5 to 6 times until moderately coarsely chopped; add to the drippings in the kettle. Coarsely chop the remaining onion with the celery the same way and add to the kettle.

Add the carrots to the processor and churn 10 to 15 seconds until fairly finely chopped. Add to the kettle along with the lemon zest and reserved chopped parsley and herbs. Stir well to mix.

Set the kettle over low heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables very soft but not brown.

Meanwhile, add the tomatoes to the processor (no need to wash the bowl or blade), and reduce to juice by churning 30 seconds.

Add the tomatoes to the kettle together with the wine and stir well to mix. Return the veal shanks to the kettle, pushing down under the liquid. Bring to a boil over moderately high heat, then adjust the heat so the mixture bubbles gently, cover, and simmer very slowly until the meat almost falls from the bones, 3 1/2 to 4 hours. Remove the strips of lemon zest and discard. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust as needed--but remember there's salt in the gremolata.

For the gremolata: Coarsely chop garlic and lemon zest with the salt in a mini food processor using 2 (5-second) pulses, scraping the work bowl and lid in between. Use the 'grind' mode if your mini offers that option. Add the parsley and coarsely chop with 3 (2-second) pulses, again scraping the work bowl and lid between each. (If the mini has 'chop' mode, use it for the parsley.)

Scatter the gremolata evenly over the veal shanks, cover, and simmer for 5 minutes more.

Serve the ossobuco with boiled rice--either over it or beside it.


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