Pasta Puttanesca

This sauce is named for ladies of the night. They would place pots of it in their windows to tempt men into the bordellos. I like it because[ it's spicy, fast and easy (no disrespect to the ladies).]

Total Time:
30 min
Prep:
15 min
Cook:
15 min

Yield:
4 servings
Level:
Easy

Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons (2 turns around the pan) extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 to 6 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 tin flat anchovy fillets, drained
  • 1 /2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 20 oil-cured black olives, cracked away from pit and coarsely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons capers
  • 1 (32-ounce) can chunky style crushed tomatoes
  • 1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained
  • A few grinds black pepper
  • 1/4 cup (a couple of handfuls) flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • 1 pound spaghetti, cooked to al dente (with a bite)
  • Crusty bread, for mopping
  • Grated Parmigiano Reggiano or Romano, for passing, optional
  • Bitter Greens Salad:
  • 4 cups (about 2 bundles) arugula leaves, coarsely chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups (about 1 bundle) watercress leaves, coarsely chopped
  • 1 head Radicchio lettuce, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large lemon
  • Extra-virgin olive oil, to coat, 2 to 3 tablespoons
  • Coarse salt and black pepper
  • Oil cured black olives, for garnish, optional
Directions

Serving suggestions: a simple salad of mixed bitter greens dressed with oil and vinegar, salt, and pepper, recipe follows

Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add oil, garlic, anchovies, and crushed pepper. Saute mixture until anchovies melt into oil and completely dissolve and garlic is tender, about 3 minutes: your kitchen never smelled so good! Add olives, capers, tomatoes, black pepper, and parsley. Bring sauce to a bubble, reduce heat, and simmer 8 to 10 minutes.

Toss sauce with cooked pasta. Pass bread and cheese at the table and serve with a simple salad of mixed bitter greens dressed with oil and vinegar, salt, and pepper.

Cook's Note: Get your olives from the bulk bins in the market, rather than buying a jar. The unit price is always much less per pound and you can get just what you need for each recipe.

Bitter Greens Salad:

Combine greens in a salad bowl. Squeeze the juice of 1 lemon over the bowl. Drizzle salad liberally with extra virgin olive oil. Toss salad and season salad with salt and pepper. Arrange salad on plates. Garnish plates with black olives, if using.


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4.5 145
Very easy and delicious! This is a great take on a tomato pasta sauce that brings the umami with anchovies and the salty acid edge from the olives and capers with a little kick from the red pepper. A great combination. We added some leftover grilled shrimp and pan-fried scallops at the last minute to make it 'di Mare'. I will be making this again and using it as a base to build from! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Norman Bruce, my friend your half right. And Rachael Ray is partially right too !!..Puttanesca was first made in Napoli. The story of the Prostitutes is probable a fable, but so is your story. Puttanesca is made as follows.....in Pot add Virgin Olive oil, chopped onions, chopped garlic and cook till soft and flavorful, add squeezed Italian whole Tomato from Italia ( Don't have to be San Marzano save your money) and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, add Kalamata olives and capers add the cooked pasta to sauce and plate...Add fresh chopped parley and Parmigiano (if you want) and enjoy..There's your Ho pasta....Buon Appetito, Norman.. And don't forget a nice bottle of "Rosso" wine ( It's Chianti, but it's not from the region of Tuscany..it's a D.O,C thing in Italia....Again, save your money). Ciao, Chef Saverio. Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/pasta-puttanesca-recipe.html#sni-reviews?oc=linkback item not reviewed by moderator and published
Amazing! I have been making this for years. As a matter-of-fact I had never even heard of puttanesca sauce until I tried this recipe. I have seen it in restaurants since I have been making it but I would never order it, afraid I would "ruin" what I thought puttanesca sauce was supposed to be. However, this past weekend I was at a pretty well known and highly rated Italian restaurant and I thought why not, I'll try the puttanesca. I have to say, mine (aka Rachel's) is better! I use Kalamata olives instead of black. I also use penne pasta and add about a pound of shrimp. People complaining of too much tomato? What? This is delicious! item not reviewed by moderator and published
That is not true that the "ladies of the night" would put the pasta in the windows to attract men into their bordellos. It was first made by a chef (Annarita Cuomoin) in a restaurant in southern Italy, when he had late night hungry guests. They insisted that he cook for them by saying "Facci una puttanata qualsiasi (Make any kind of garbage)." puttanata means something worthless. He later included this item on his menu as spaghetti alla puttanesca. item not reviewed by moderator and published
An anchovy tin in the pantry has been staring at me for weeks and tonight I finally agreed to use it! Made a few changes: used only 3 cloves of garlic as that is all I had on hand (luckily they were big, juicy, flavorful locally grown ones) used 2-14.5 oz. cans of Kirkland (Costco brand) cans of organic diced tomatoes, doubled up on the olives using an antipasto mix (also purchased from Costco in the refrigerated section) didn't have any parsley on hand so I used a few fresh basil leaves instead. Also, I didn't use any black pepper--I forgot. EXCELLENT! I think it is important to note that sauce needs to cook a while so that ALL the flavors meld. Tasting too early does not give a true representation of what this becomes after 10 or so minutes. Also, always salt your pasta water regardless of how salty your sauce is. I'm Italian and while I do respect the "rules" of cooking and eating...if you want cheese, add the cheese. But do try this dish without cheese first, you just may love it! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've been making this recipe for years, and it's delicious. I usually add a wee bit more garlic and olives but not much. I suspect anyone saying this was bland forgot to add salt and pepper or didn't use enough. (a common error for home cooks). This is a flavorful and delicious dish. Try it you'll love it. item not reviewed by moderator and published
REALLY good. I followed the recipe to the letter and found it to be perfect. My guests loved it! I don't understand how there can be too much tomato as another reviewer stated. It's a tomato sauceā€¦. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Too much tomato! Other flavors got lost except for the crushed red pepper. (I'm posting this because my other review somehow got lost). I agree with the previous reviewer. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Ugggh. Cut the tomato by at least a third, if not a half, and you have a much better dish. Typically American fear of being able to see even the tiniest bit of pasta above the surface of the sauce. Otherwise, Rachel's corporate development team has the recipe right. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I love anchovies and I love olives......but I really don't like them together in this recipe The taste was just not good. I threw it out. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Listen my friend your half right. And Rachael Ray is partially right too !!..Puttanesca was first made in Napoli. The story of the Prostitutes is probable a fable, but so is your story. Puttanesca is made as follows.....in Pot add Virgin Olive oil, chopped onions, chopped garlic and cook till soft and flavorful, add squeezed Italian whole Tomato from Italia ( Don't have to be San Marzano save your money) and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, add Kalamata olives and capers add the cooked pasta to sauce and plate...Add fresh chopped parley and Parmigiano (if you want) and enjoy..There's your Ho pasta....Buon Appetito, Norman.. And don't forget a nice bottle of "Rosso" wine ( It's Chianti, but it's not from the region of Tuscany..it's a D.O,C thing in Italia....Again, save your money). Ciao, Chef Saverio. Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/pasta-puttanesca-recipe.html#sni-reviews?oc=linkback item not reviewed by moderator and published
<div>Listen my friend your half right. And Rachael Ray is partially right too !!..Puttanesca was first made in Napoli. The story of the Prostitutes is probable a fable, but so is your story. Puttanesca is made as follows.....in Pot add Virgin Olive oil, chopped onions, chopped garlic and cook till soft and flavorful, add squeezed Italian whole Tomato from Italia ( Don't have to be San Marzano save your money) and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, add Kalamata olives and capers add the cooked pasta to sauce and plate...Add fresh chopped parley and Parmigiano (if you want) and enjoy..There's your Ho pasta....Buon Appetito, Norman.. And don't forget a nice bottle of "Rosso" wine ( It's Chianti, but it's not from the region of Tuscany..it's a D.O,C thing in Italia....Again, save your money). Ciao, Chef Saverio. Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/pasta-puttanesca-recipe.html#sni-reviews?oc=linkback</div><div><div><div><div></div><div><div>Pasta Puttanesca Recipe : Rachael Ray : Food Network</div><div><div>This sauce is named for ladies of the night. They would place pots of it in their windows to tempt men into the bordellos. I like it because[ it's spicy, fast and easy (no disrespect to the ...</div></div></div><div></div></div></div></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published

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