Saltimbocca alla Romana

Saltimbocca, veal sauteed with prosciutto and sage, is a festive and easy supper. A classic of Roman cuisine, saltimbocca means "jumps in[ the mouth." Although veal scallops are traditional, the dish also can be prepared with boneless slices of turkey breast or boneless chicken breasts. Some cooks don't like the prosciutto side to get crispy, but this doesn't bother me. The pan may be deglazed with stock alone or in combination with wine. I like to serve saltimbocca with green beans or spinach, and mashed potatoes are nice if you want a starch accompaniment.]

Total Time:
25 min
Prep:
10 min
Cook:
15 min

Yield:
1 serving
Level:
Easy

CATEGORIES
Ingredients
  • 2 large veal scallops or uncooked boneless turkey breast slices (about 8 to 10 ounces total weight and each 1/3 inch thick, or 2 boneless skinless chicken breast halves)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 fresh sage leaves
  • 2 thin slices prosciutto
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock reduced to 1/4 cup
  • 1/4 cup dry Marsala, dry white wine, or additional stock
  • 1 tablespoons unsalted butter
Directions

Pound the meat slightly between sheets of plastic wrap to a uniform thickness of 1/4-inch. Sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper and top each piece with 2 sage leaves. Cover the sage with the prosciutto slices and skewer into place with toothpicks.

In a saute pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the meat, prosciutto and sage-side down, and saute until golden on the first side, about 3 minutes. Turn and cook the other side, about 3 minutes longer. Remove to a warmed plate and keep warm.

Pour inthe stock and the wine and deglaze the pan over high heat, scraping up any brown bits stuck to the bottom. Boil until the pan juices reduce and are thickened. Remove the pan from the heat and swirl in the butter. Spoon over the saltimbocca and eat at once.

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