This recipe has won me many awards. It is nearly foolproof and will bring a smile to even the most skeptical person.
Recipe courtesy of The Pastrami Project
Save Recipe Print
Traditional Potato Latkes
Total:
50 min
Active:
35 min
Yield:
12 to 15 latkes
Level:
Intermediate
Total:
50 min
Active:
35 min
Yield:
12 to 15 latkes
Level:
Intermediate

Ingredients

Directions

Special equipment: a food processor; disposable gloves

Turn out the shredded potatoes into a large bowl.

If you have an exhaust fan in your kitchen, turn it on and place the food processor underneath it--the smell from the processed onion will be very strong.

Place the matzo in the food processor and pulse until you have a range of sizes, from 1/4-inch to nearly flour. Dump this onto the potatoes.

Put the food processor back together and place the onion and the salt and pepper in the bowl. Process until nearly liquid, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.

Add the eggs to the food processor and process until completely incorporated and the mixture turns almost white. Dump this onto the potatoes.

Put on a pair of disposable gloves and mix everything together by hand. (If you don't use gloves, the onion smell will cling to your hands for a very long time.)

Form the mixture into latkes: Take enough to fill the palm of your hand, then press your hands together hard, palm-to-palm, squeezing until some liquid comes out. You should end up with a disc that's thicker in the middle, like a flying saucer. Turn the disc around in your hands while patting the sides to firm it up. Give the latke one last squeeze--it's ready for the fryer. (When I make them, my latkes average 3 ounces each.)

In a deep-fat fryer or heavy medium pot, heat several inches of oil to 375 degrees F.

In batches, gently put the latkes into the hot oil and leave them alone to fry until golden brown, turning only once, about 4 minutes. The perfect latke will be golden brown and crispy on the outside, soft and white and warm on the inside. You can expect some shreds of potato to come loose; just scoop them out when the latkes are done. If a latke falls apart while frying, it's a sign you have to squeeze harder!

Using tongs, remove the latkes from the oil; there is no need to drain. Serve hot, with a generous dollop of sour cream or apple sauce for dipping.

Cook's Note

Using individually quick fozen (IQF) packaged shredded potatoes eliminates most problems with moisture. Resist the temptation to substitute breadcrumbs for the matzo. They aren't the same, and the taste, texture and appearance will change greatly. The latke mixture will keep in the refrigerator for several days, but be prepared: you'll have to squeeze the latkes even harder to get the water out.

This recipe was provided by a chef, restaurant or culinary professional. It has not been tested for home use.

Trending Videos 6 Videos

Get the recipe

Sushi Brain 00:53

This sushi brain is the most delicious way to creep out your friends.

Similar Topics:

IDEAS YOU'LL LOVE

Grandma Jean's Potato Salad

Recipe courtesy of The Neelys

Spanish Chicken and Potato Roast

Recipe courtesy of Food Network Kitchen

Creamy Dijon-Dill Potato Salad

Recipe courtesy of Dave Lieberman

Potato Latkes

Recipe courtesy of Sherman's Deli & Bakery

Potato Latkes

Recipe courtesy of Ina Garten

Potato Latkes

Recipe courtesy of Joan Nathan

Potato Latkes

Recipe courtesy of Aaron Bashy

Potato Latkes

Potato Latkes

Recipe courtesy of Michele Urvater

Browse Reviews By Keyword

          Food Network Apps

          In the Kitchen

          Get over 70,000 FN recipes on all your mobile devices.

          Facebook Messenger

          Ask our bot for recipes, meal ideas and daily food trivia.