The Best New Baseball Park Foods

The editors at Food Network Magazine checked out the food at all 30 Major League stadiums and picked nine standout bites — one for each inning. Eater up!
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Photo By: Jeff Harris

Photo By: Jeff Harris

Photo By: Jeff Harris

Photo By: Jeff Harris

Photo By: Jeff Harris

Photo By: Jeff Harris

Photo By: Jeff Harris

Pulled Pork Pierogi Stacker at PNC Park (Pittsburgh Pirates)

PNC Park ran a contest in 2011 asking fans to designate a signature sandwich, and the Pulled Pork Pierogi Stacker won top honors. It's smoked pulled pork, onion jam and two boiled pierogi on a pretzel bun — all meant to honor the city's Polish and Eastern European residents.

 

Photograph by Jeff Harris

Sweet Spot Cotton Candy Dog at Globe Life Park (Texas Rangers)

Globe Life Park is famous for its over-the-top franks — the stadium sells 16 options in all. Inspiration for this cotton candy–topped dog came from a player: A concessions manager was brainstorming toppings when he spotted Rangers first-baseman Prince Fielder snacking on cotton candy. The sauce on top is blue cotton candy mixed with yellow mustard (hence the green color).

 

Photograph by Jeff Harris

S'mores Bacon on a Stick at Citi Field (New York Mets)

The Pig Guy stand at Citi Field sells three kinds of bacon on a stick, but the fan favorite is the one that's dunked in chocolate and rolled in a crushed graham cracker and marshmallow mixture. Yes, s'mores-flavored smoked pork belly sounds like a bad idea, but most people go from "That's gross" to "This is amazing" in less than a bite.

 

Photograph by Jeff Harris

Cleveland Caramel Fries at Progressive Field (Cleveland Indians)

This dish started with a Chopped-style challenge: The park's concessions manager asked his team to create a new menu item based on fresh-cut fries — and whatever else was in the kitchen. The result was deep-fried spuds drenched in caramel and chocolate sauce, with a heaping side of whipped cream. Word has it the staffers will sneak you a sample if you're skeptical.

 

Photograph by Jeff Harris

Crab Waffle Fries at Oriole Park at Camden Yards (Baltimore Orioles)

What nacho cheese is to most ballparks, crab dip is to Oriole Park: You can order it over chips, pretzels and sausages, but the perennial crowd-pleaser is the crab dip french fry. The chefs tested a bunch of different fries before settling on the waffle cut — its nooks and crannies can hold the most dip.

 

Photograph by Jeff Harris

Tater Tot Chop at Turner Field (Atlanta Braves)

It's a rookie mistake to think this sandwich is made with regular waffles — these are Tater Tots pressed in a waffle iron and stuffed with bacon, cheese and jalapenos. The ketchup is infused with Coca-Cola, another Atlanta home team.

 

Photograph by Jeff Harris

Chicken and Waffle Cone at Minute Maid Park (Houston Astros)

Forks and knives don't really have a place in the stands, so in Houston, two Southern favorites — popcorn chicken and mashed potatoes — are served in a waffle cone. This year, the chefs are rolling out a toppings bar, including jalapenos, roasted peppers, barbecue sauce, honey mustard and country gravy.

 

Photograph by Jeff Harris

Bigger Better Burger Bloody Mary at Target Field (Minnesota Twins)

Like most Bloody Marys, this one comes with a celery stalk. It also comes with a beef stick, a pickle, cheese cubes, pepperoncini and an olive. Oh, and a bacon cheeseburger slider. It took chefs a while to figure out how to serve the drink while the slider was still warm, but their effort was for naught: Many customers spend a few minutes photographing the thing before they dig in.

 

Photograph by Jeff Harris

Down Wisconsin Avenue Brat at Miller Park (Milwaukee Brewers)

This foot-and-a-half treat might be the most Wisconsin-themed dish in all of Wisconsin: It's two 9-inch bratwursts (a nod to Milwaukee's German population) loaded with sauerkraut, fried jalapenos, cheese sauce and cheese curds, the quintessential Badger State snack. The name "Down Wisconsin Avenue" comes from game announcer Bob Uecker — it's how he describes pitches thrown right across home plate.

 

Photograph by Jeff Harris

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