Food Network Star, Season 9: Top Moments of Episode 6

Get an inside look at the finalists' challenges and relive the most memorable moments from the sixth episode of Food Network Star, Season 9.

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Stars as Brands

Bobby, Giada and Alton aren't just food stars — they're also brands that encompass restaurants, food and household goods, and more. They challenge the finalists to see themselves as brands, too, and to create two food products that align with their culinary points of view. After tasting their dishes, the mentors will determine which they think will most impress a panel of marketing experts.

Sweet and Savory

Leave it to the Pie Man to create the duo of a sweet pie and savory quiche with the help of "pie kits," which come complete with everything needed to prepare the dishes at home. "There's not a doggone soul who's making anything that's close to what I have," Rodney says of his idea.

Colorful Woes

Nikki prepares two sauces, but the spinach-based one has turned an off-putting brown-green hue. Like she's feared, the Selection Committee notes that it's ultimately unsuccessful because of its lack of visual appeal. "I just simply wouldn't buy a container that had something like that in it," Alton tells her. She decides to pitch her tomatillo sauce, despite the fact that she hasn't perfected its texture.

Childhood Memories

Given his broad point of view, Chris struggles to decide which products to prepare, but he settles on a corn bisque and apple-bell pepper jam, both dishes that remind him of home in Ohio. His jam is the stronger of the two, but the judges recommend that Chris market it as a ketchup instead. "You want to let them know it's something more of a savory idea," Giada explains.

Sinful Goals

"I want to become a national brand. I want to become a household name," Russell says of his goals for the future. Embracing his culinary sins, he creates "bacon candy" plus bourbon-laced chocolate ice cream with ginger and chiles, but it's his sweet meat that's most intriguing. "It's something you don't find often, and that would give them a reason to buy it," declares Giada.

Ode to the Past

Inspired by her grandmother's recipe book, Damaris opts to make a duo of Southern-style goods, including a whiskey vinaigrette and a peach and chile jam. "I'm making these products kind of just as a tribute to her." Her spiked dressing is a flop with the mentors, who recommend that Damaris present the jam instead. "I'm relying on their knowledge because I'm just totally lost," she explains.

Throwback Decor

Meeting with a graphic designer to imagine the packaging and labeling of their products, the finalists share their thoughts on what they'd like their brands to convey. Stacey hopes the label on her spiced butterscotch sauce includes a doily, as "it's very kind of '50s in essence," she explains.

Visible Beans

"My goal with the packaging is that you can see through to my beans," Chad notes, opting for a clear jar to house his barbecue baked beans. "There's no one that does beans right on the shelf."

Quiche and a Song

Presenting their products in front of executives from Kraft, Target and the Kellogg Company, the finalists must explain their perceived brand and how their packaging fits into it. Rodney surprises the panel with an impromptu "Pie-Style" song, which, while impressive, doesn't sell the contents of his pie kits.

Beyond Her Scope

"I think I just didn't think through the overall concept and product enough," Nikki says after her presentation. She's caught off-guard when one of the executives questions where she envisions her pepper sauce being sold on store shelves. Like the mentors, the panel, too, isn't wowed by the texture of her dish, and she finishes in the bottom this week.

Clear Mistake

Although Chris has high hopes for his beans' see-through jar, the executives believe it to be a misstep, as it "looks a little bit like sloppy joe mix," according to one. He places among the bottom four this week at evaluation, even though the panel is pleased with his pitch. "I sold my product great, but the product might have failed a little bit," he reflects after.

Sticking to the Script

While her butterscotch is considered a success among the panel and Selection Committee alike, Stacey's performance is seen as too rehearsed, as she's forced to begin her lines again after briefly jumbling her words. "We need some more spontaneity from you," Bobby tells her.

Alter Ego

Damaris delivers a calmer, more in-control version of herself to the panel, but she says, "It just feels kind of like a robot version of me." The judges aren't happy with Damaris' new facade, as Bobby tells her, "We need zany. We want your true personality." Her product, however, is well-received, one executive even noting, "I'm not sure I'd change much" in terms of the packaging.

Questioning Candy

The executives are quick to enjoy the deliciously sinful nature of Russell's dish but they struggle to deem it "candy." Nevertheless, he's among the top-three performers this week and is safe from elimination.

Bottom Two

Given his sorry sales pitch that failed to tell the story of his ketchup, Chris is one of the least successful finalists of the day. "I'm concerned because I feel like you've gone backward," Bobby explains to him.

Professional Farewell

In the end, Chris' stumbles are enough to force his exit, and he's let go after six hard-fought weeks in the competition. "I do great when I connect with people. I do great when I connect with a cause," he reflects. "But when it comes down to trying to sell a product, based on my beliefs, it's very hard."

Chance at Salvation

Chris enters Round 3 of Star Salvation with host Robert Irvine for the chance to re-enter the competition. Watch the episode to see how he fares.

Go Behind the Scenes

Browse exclusive snapshots of the finalists and judge-mentors on set, plus learn insider trivia about the show from Food Network's culinary team.

Want More Food Network Star?

Visit Food Network's Food Network Star headquarters for more insider coverage of the show.

More from:

Food Network Star