Guy's Grocery Games: Impossible — Meet the Competitors

These nine chefs have signed up for the chance to beat Mr. Impossible, Robert Irvine, with the hopes of winning up to $40,000.

Photo By: David Moir ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: David Moir ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: David Moir ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: David Moir ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: David Moir ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: David Moir ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: David Moir ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: David Moir ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: David Moir ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Part 1: Brian Goodman — Cleveland

As the chef and owner of three restaurants in Cleveland, Brian knows how to keep his business in tiptop shape. People know not to cross the boss. Brian started his culinary learning early, first cooking with his aunt, and then working in New York City restaurants in his 20s. Originally from New Jersey, he's made a comfortable new home for himself in the Midwest. "I'm a born winner, a born leader," he says, ready to take on Mr. Impossible.

Part 1: Kevin Champion — Rochester, N.Y.

As a youngster, Kevin was shuffled between foster homes. Once adopted by a loving family, he found his love for eating and cooking. With his parents he's traveled the world, familiarizing himself with different cuisines that he enjoys fusing in his cooking. Now he's a sous chef at 2 Vine restaurant. "Nothing fazes me now," he says of his whirlwind life. "When things are at their craziest, that's when I'm at my best." With a last name like Champion, he feels he's got this win in the bag.

Part 1: Toya Boudy — New Orleans

As a culinary instructor at the New Orleans School of Cooking, Toya knows Creole and Cajun cuisine from top to bottom. "I can do anything — if I can smell it, I can cook it. Chef Irvine won't know what hit him," she says. Coming from humble beginnings, Toya learned to fight for what she wanted. And when Hurricane Katrina turned her family's life upside down, she started anew in just two weeks. She feels she can win the competition with her resilience and competitive drive.

Part 2: Alex Malmborg — Salt Lake City

Alex is the executive chef for the largest ski resort in the country, Park City Mountain, which includes 13 restaurants. He's an avid extreme sportsman who's known for pushing the limits of possibility. "I'm always up to take on the impossible," he says. "I'm not afraid of anything, especially Robert Irvine." Alex considers his former employer, Chef Ming Tsai, his mentor. "His attention to detail and passion for everything has shaped me," he says. With the winnings, Alex wants to support his wife's new venture.

Part 2: Andy Hyde — Naples, Fla.

Born in Ghana and raised in Germany and the United States, Andy considers himself an intercontinental chef. He currently runs his own catering company, Chef Hyde Gourmet, out of Naples, Florida. He's worked under Gordon Ramsay and has cooked for diplomatic figures and millionaires, so he knows the demands of the kitchen and his clientele. "I'm not scared of anyone," he says. "I can do the impossible because I can adapt to any situation." Andy wants to win for his foundation, which helps disadvantaged children and teaches them culinary skills.

Part 2: Samantha Mitchell — St. Louis

Samantha's a new mother, and she's also the owner of her own food truck, Farmtruk, which specializes in sustainable foods. Starting in restaurants at the tender age of 16, she was often the only woman on the line, but she proved herself again and again. "Even though I'm 5'2", I'm freakishly strong. I butcher whole animals," she says. "Don't underestimate me." She's known to be a workaholic, but now with a family to support, she wants to win so she can set up a nice nest egg.

Part 3: Marc Felix — St. Louis

As a restaurant consultant and private chef, Marc considers himself a "Jacques Cousteau of the culinary world." Growing up in France, he saw how much of life revolved around food in his own village. After attending culinary school, he was on the way to working in restaurants in Europe. He has done unusual dining art experiments, cooked for celebrities and hosted a cooking show for kids. He's written cookbooks and has his own spice line, but his pride and joy is teaching troubled kids culinary skills.

Part 3: Nelle Bauer — Albuquerque, N.M.

Nelle wears many hats in her life and work. "I'm only comfortable under stress," she says of her interests. "I eat the impossible for breakfast." Her road to a food career was a winding one. After graduating with a physics degree, she enrolled in culinary school, after which she wrote for food magazines in New York. It was during an assignment that she met her partner, Jennifer. The two moved to New Mexico, where they now run Jennifer James 101. In addition to working in the restaurant, Nelle is a full-time law student.

Part 3: Stephen Jones — Phoenix

It was a passion for cooking that kept Stephen off the streets when he was growing up, but it didn't turn into a career until much later. After an injury playing college football, Stephen found his way to culinary school. He's worked at restaurants in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Chicago and now Phoenix, where he's the executive chef of The Larder + the Delta, which earned the accolade "best new restaurant" the year it opened. Stephen wants to use his winnings to help his community.

More Guy's Grocery Games: Impossible

Keep up on the competition by browsing highlights from the tournament. Watch videos from the battles. Plus, take a behind-the-scenes look at Flavortown Market, study up on all the games, and get Guy's tips for winning it all. 

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Guy's Grocery Games