grits


Though now commonly used to mean "hominy grits," the term "grits" actually refers to any coarsely ground grain such as corn, oats or rice. Most grits come in a choice of grinds — coarse, medium and fine. Grits can be cooked with water or milk — usually by boiling or baking — and eaten as cereal or served as a side dish.

From The Food Lover's Companion, Fourth edition by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst. Copyright © 2007, 2001, 1995, 1990 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

Keep Reading

Next Up

Shrimp and Grits — Down-Home Comfort

Down-home comfort has caught fire in the last 10 years or so with the classic low-country dish Shrimp and Grits. It’s being served in white tablecloth restaurants from Savannah to Seattle.

Cheesy Grits with Fried Eggs and Vegetables — Meatless Monday

Grits are reborn as a flavor-forward dish in this easy recipe from Food Network Magazine.

Country Ham with Stone-Ground Grits — Down-Home Comfort

Country hams have long been a Southern staple and one old-time recipe is country ham served on a bed of creamy grits topped with redeye gravy.

30-Minute Shrimp and Grits — Most Popular Pin of the Week

Find out how to prepare an easy, healthy weeknight meal in a hurry with Food Network Magazine's go-to recipe.

Shockingly Healthy (and Easy) Lemon-Garlic Shrimp and Grits — Most Popular Pin of the Week

Yes, comfort food can be healthy. See how to transform traditionally indulgent shrimp and grits into a lighter pick.

Make-Ahead Sausage and Cheese Grits Casserole — Down-Home Comfort

Grits are easy to prepare, can be a main meal or a side dish, will hold for hours in a low oven and reheat wonderfully as leftovers, even in the microwave.