pork shoulder


Pork shoulder is also known as picnic ham. Not really a true ham (which comes from the pig's back leg), the picnic ham is taken from the upper part of the foreleg and includes a portion of the shoulder. This cut is also more accurately referred to as the picnic shoulder or pork shoulder. The picnic ham is smoked, which gives it a very ham-like flavor. It often has the bone removed. Though it's slightly tougher (requiring longer cooking) and has more waste because of the bone structure, picnic ham is a good, inexpensive substitute for regular ham.

From The Food Lover's Companion, Fourth edition by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst. Copyright © 2007, 2001, 1995, 1990 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

Keep Reading

Next Up

One Pork Shoulder, 5 Ways

No ifs, ands or butts about it: turn one slow-cooked pork shoulder into five different meals.

Should You Eat Bugs?

Insects like crickets, mealworms, ants and caterpillars are being touted as one of the hottest culinary trends. Should these crawly critters be part of your diet?

Why You Should Drink Port

In world of Unicorn Frappuccinos, port is like grandpa yelling at the grandkids to put their phones down and have some darn respect.

Poll: Who Should Go Home on Sunday?

Who, in your opinion, doesn't have the chops to be a Food Network star? Which finalist do you want to see go home next?

Why You Should Braise in Foil

Food Network Kitchens' Katherine Alford's hot tips for foil packet grilling.

8 Foods You Should Not Refrigerate

Are you storing your produce correctly? Here are 8 farmers’ markets finds that should stay out of the fridge.

How Long Should Your Workouts Be?

Finding the time to work out can be beyond challenging. Once you do carve out time to hit the gym, how much time should you spend sweating it out?

Nutrients A Vegetarian Should Worry About

We’ll walk through the basic types of vegetarianism and fill you in on which nutrients those with a meat-free diet need to pay special attention to.

Should You Be Focusing on Calories?

Beating age-related weight gain isn’t just a matter of counting calories. The specific foods you eat — and avoid — play a part.