Reuse Good Olive Oil

Caprese Salad with artichokes

CAPRESE_SALAD_ARTICHOKES_024.tif

Food Stylist: Jamie Kimm Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Antonis Achilleos

Antonis Achilleos

Hot tips from Food Network Kitchens' Katherine Alford:

After pan-frying something in extra-virgin olive oil, drizzle the leftover oil from the skillet on salads or bread. The oil is especially tasty after you've fried peppers, onions or other flavorful vegetables, like the artichokes in Food Network Magazine's Caprese Salad With Prosciutto and Fried Artichokes (pictured above). Don't use this trick with vegetable oil, though: It's too bland for drizzling.

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