Reuse Good Olive Oil

Caprese Salad with artichokes

CAPRESE_SALAD_ARTICHOKES_024.tif

Food Stylist: Jamie Kimm Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Antonis Achilleos

Antonis Achilleos

Hot tips from Food Network Kitchens' Katherine Alford:

After pan-frying something in extra-virgin olive oil, drizzle the leftover oil from the skillet on salads or bread. The oil is especially tasty after you've fried peppers, onions or other flavorful vegetables, like the artichokes in Food Network Magazine's Caprese Salad With Prosciutto and Fried Artichokes (pictured above). Don't use this trick with vegetable oil, though: It's too bland for drizzling.

Next Up

Does Olive Oil Go Bad?

An olive oil expert and producer weighs in.

How Much Olive Oil Should You Use When Cooking?

You don't want to overdo it — but there are ways to eyeball the measurements.

What Is Extra Virgin Olive Oil?

Extra virgin olive oil, affectionately known as EVOO, is a pantry staple. Why does it come in smaller bottles and cost more than regular olive oil? It all has to do with how the olives are pressed to extract the oil that goes into the bottles.

Now, Everyone Can Get Olive Oil in Their Starbucks Drink

Previously offered in only 15 states, Starbucks is now offering Oleato beverages nationwide.

Here Are the Best Fats for Weight Loss

Good-for-you fats exist, and you need to start eating them.

What Is Lard?

Everything to know about this often misunderstood ingredient.

Canola vs. Vegetable Oil: What’s the Difference?

And can you use them interchangeably?

How to Make Ghee

It's an easy, flavorful way to instantly upgrade your cooking.

What's New