Crispy Business: How to Make Parmesan Crisps

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Food Stylist: Karen Evans

Photo by: Kang Kim

Kang Kim

Parmesan crisps ( frico in Italian) look fancy, but they're actually just cheese and crackers for the lazy. You get the crunch of a cracker plus big cheese flavor in one — and they're super easy to make. Toss 1 1/2 cups freshly grated Parmesan with 1 tablespoon flour, then flavor with 1 to 2 teaspoons minced herbs, spices and/or citrus zest. Form the cheese mixture into 12 mounds (2 tablespoons each) and place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment and coated with cooking spray; then flatten into 4-inch rounds. Bake at 375 degrees F until golden, 8 to 10 minutes. While hot, gently remove them from the sheet with a thin spatula and let cool completely.

Clockwise from top left: Lemon zest, Pepper, Curry-coriander, Smoked paprika and Scallion

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