Eating Alone Is Bad for Your Health, Study Suggests

Maybe invite a friend over for dinner tonight.

It’s hard to know how to put this in a way that will not depress solo apartment dwellers and, um, anyone who has ever solitarily scarfed down a meal: Eating alone may be slowly doing you in.

Yeah, sorry.

A new study conducted by researchers in South Korea has found that dining alone may boost the risk for developing metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions, including elevated blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess fat around your midsection, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that put you at a greater risk for developing heart disease, stroke and/or diabetes. (Oof.)

Men who frequently eat alone are at particular risk — with a 45 percent higher chance of becoming obese and a 64 percent higher chance for developing metabolic syndrome than those who always dined with others — the researchers found, according to the New York Daily News. Women who frequently eat alone were 29 percent more likely to develop metabolic syndrome than those who generally have company.

It’s unclear what other factors — stress, sleep, sadness about solitude — might be at play. Or whether the increased risk may simply be a matter of not having anyone around to see you make less than healthy food choices.

Regardless, it may be worth inviting a friend over for dinner tonight. And if we’re taking science at its depressing word, maybe make it a skinny one. (Double oof.)

Photo: iStock

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