New Scratch-and-Sniff Stamps Will Make Your Mail Smell Like Summer

Guess the USPS realized that aromatic envelopes just made scents.

This summer, expect your mailbox to get a little more aromatic. The U.S. Postal Service has announced plans to release its first ever scratch-and-sniff stamps, with a scent it describes as "sweet summer."

The Frozen Treats Forever stamps, available in booklets of 20, will be released on June 20. (You can pre-order them on the USPS website.) The collection will include 10 different designs, each featuring watercolor images — by Santa Monica, California, artist Margaret Berg — of two colorful ice pops.

The stamps are perfect to adorn the envelopes for a summer barbecue or party invitation (assuming anyone actually snail-mails those anymore) or a love letter to your sweetie (ditto, but maybe we all should).

"In recent years, frozen treats containing fresh fruit such as kiwi, watermelon, blueberries, oranges and strawberries have become more common," the USPS observed in a press announcing the new scented stamps. "In addition, flavors such as chocolate, root beer and cola are also popular. Some frozen treats even have two sticks, making them perfect for sharing."

They may be the first stamps you actually want to lick.

Photo courtesy of U.S. Postal Service

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