‘Hangry’ Has Officially Made It Into the Dictionary

Merriam-Webster’s wordniks have given the informal adjective their official blessing.

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A man holding a fresh hamburger and second one waiting in row. Fresh ground burger with onion, lettuce, tomato served with french fries.

Photo by: sorendls ©sorendls

sorendls, sorendls

It seems only yesterday – although it was, in fact, three years ago – that the word hangry was added to the Oxford Dictionaries. Now the word has made it into Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Hangry is an informal adjective meaning “irritable or angry because of hunger,” but of course you already knew that because, as Merriam-Webster noted in an announcement, “new words are added to the dictionary only when they have already been used by many people—often initially by specialists or subcultures.”

It’s worth noting that hangry is one of more than 840 words Merriam-Webster is stirring into its official mix.

Several of those words are food related. Such as? Well, you can now drink a marg and eat some zuke, as well as dip a chip in some guac -- loaded with avo, naturally.

Or you can wash down some zoodles with a mocktail; cook a meal, taking care with your mise en place, and season it with gochujang; or taste a flight of beers, especially if you’re a serious hophead.

Oh, and if you’re feeling irritated or angry that it took the dictionary so long to officially acknowledge any of these words, you, um, may want to consider getting a snack.

Photo: iStock

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