What Do I Do with Rutabagas?

Rutabagas (sometimes called swedes in parts of the world) are fairly similar to turnips, with a slightly bitter flavor and a yellower interior. They are actually a cross between turnips and cabbage, and this is evident in the flavor, which is a bit milder than a turnip’s when raw, and buttery and sweet-savory, though still a bit bitter (kind of like a Yukon gold potato on steroids), when cooked. They are large and round, with a thick, smooth, hard skin that needs to be peeled before eating, and should feel heavy for their size. The leaves can also be eaten, prepared in the same way as turnip tops or other hearty greens.

Rutabagas are used in all sorts of cuisines, from Scandinavian to British to American. They can be eaten raw, but are usually roasted, cooked and mashed (sometimes with potatoes or other root vegetables), and used in casseroles, stews and soups. They are high in vitamin C, a good source of potassium and high in fiber.

Refrigerate rutabagas, unwashed, in a plastic bag for up to 10 days.

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©Copyright 2016. All rights reserved.

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