What Do I Do with Parsnips?

Parsnips are a classic ingredient in some chicken broths and soups, and can also be baked, sauteed, steamed, mashed or pureed, roasted, used in stews and fried.
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The parsnip is a root vegetable related to both carrots and parsley (and, come to think of it, don't the tops of carrots look a lot like parsley?). Parsnips are shaped much like carrots, a bit wider at the base, with a creamy yellow-beige skin and interior. They should be smooth, hard and free of soft spots or sprouts, and are best when harvested young so they don't develop a woody core.

Parsnips are usually cooked but can also be eaten raw. They have a lot going on nutritionally: They are filled with vitamins, high in the minerals potassium and manganese, and a good source of fiber. Parsnips can be used in the same ways as carrots, though their flavor is markedly sweeter, especially when cooked, more like a great sweet potato. They are a classic ingredient in some chicken broths and soups, and can also be baked, sauteed, steamed, mashed or pureed, roasted, used in stews and fried, like most root vegetables.

Refrigerate them, unwashed, in a plastic bag up to 10 days. Parsnips should be scrubbed with a brush under running water or peeled before eating.

Some great ways to use parsnips:

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141111_FNM_WND_Parsnips_256.tif

Photo by: Justin Walker

Justin Walker

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Glazed Chicken_002.tif

Food Styling - Jamie Kimm Prop Styling - Marina Malchin

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STEAK_ROOT_VEG_012.tif

Food stylist: Jamie Kim Prop Stylist: Marina Malchin

Photo by: Antonis Achilleos

Antonis Achilleos

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