5 Globally-Inspired Ways to Build a Grain Bowl

CC MEXICAN QUINOA BREAKFAST BOWL Cooking Channel Red Quinoa, Greek Yogurt, Lime, Cilantro, Black Beans, Salsa, Avocado, Radishes, Pepitas

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

When it comes to building a good grain bowl, you might find that any difficulty is less about cooking and more about actually putting the dish together. Whether you’re starting with a mishmash of leftovers or a fully stocked fridge and pantry, think of the bowl as a culinary collage – it helps to have a theme. So for your next attempt, try taking inspiration from your favorite cuisines. Here are a few ideas to get you started.

Start your morning with this savory breakfast bowl for a protein and fiber boost to your day. A tangy dressing of Greek yogurt, lime juice and cilantro helps tie in the flavors and textures of the avocado, black beans, salsa, radishes and quinoa.

Food Network Kitchen’s barley bistro bowl as seen on Food Network.

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Stephen Johnson, 2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

The makings of a classic French bistro salad work just as well in a grain bowl, with yolk from the fried egg helping to add richness and moisture to the dish. Tip: Cook barley ahead of time in a big batch. It can keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 days or in the freezer for up to a month.

Food Network Kitchen’s brown rice bowl with curried roasted cauliflower and green chutney as seen on Food Network.

This bright-hued dish is centered on Indian flavors with curried cauliflower and a green chutney made from yogurt, spinach, cilantro and jalapeno.

Photo by: EA Stewart ©2015, Television Food Network, G. P. All Rights Reserved.

EA Stewart, 2015, Television Food Network, G. P. All Rights Reserved.

Once your sorghum is cooked, you’re ready to build a quick and easy Greek salad-inspired bowl with tomatoes, cucumbers, feta cheese and olives.

Though teriyaki bowls are often paired with rice, quinoa makes for an excellent substitute. The sweetness of the teriyaki-glazed salmon is balanced by the acidity in the Japanese rice wine and lemon zest used for the vegetables.

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