How Warm Should Butter Be When Baking Cookies?

Mindy Segal has the exact answer (and the best buttery cookie to bake)!

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When a cookie craving strikes, sometimes you have just minutes to answer the call. If you, like me, have made several batches of last-minute cookies in your life, you’ve probably asked yourself, “does room-temperature butter temperature really matter?” Surely it’s fine to just melt it in the microwave or whip it while it’s cold, right?

Not exactly. There is a reason why bakers recommend room temperature butter. Butter is a solid fat, but it’s also able to be whipped at room temperature. The whipping process will create air pockets, resulting in a fluffier, even-textured cookie. Butter that is too warm (looking at you, microwave) or too cold won’t aerate properly, which means you’re looking at an inconsistent and not-so-fluffy dessert.

Ok, so you understand why butter needs to be room temperature before you can bake it with it. But how do you know when it’s the right room temperature? Mindy Segal explains it all in her Snickerdoodles class on the Food Network Kitchen App.

According to Mindy, the perfect temperature for butter is a bit colder than you think. “That’s the misconception of butter when they say room temperature,” she says. “Most people think the butter should be so soft that it’s broken down, but the most important thing is that you want a little bit of give to the butter.” If you want to get technical, she says the precise temperature should be between 63 and 68 degrees — where it’s cool to touch, but your finger can leave an indent. This will yield a beautifully structured cookie.

Once you have your butter at the right temperature, it’s easy as pie (or cookies, we should say), to make a delicious, perfectly textured dessert. Mindy’s snickerdoodles are slightly crispy on the outside, chewy on the inside and full of that crave-worthy cinnamon sugar flavor. While she whips up a batch, she shares even more tips and tricks to get the perfect cookie — but you’ll have to see for yourself to find out.

For the best sweets and treats, tune into one of Mindy Segal’s on-demand classes on the Food Network Kitchen app. She’ll walk you through the entire process of making cookies, banana bread, pies and more — and you’re sure to feel like a pro by the time you’re done.

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