A Stationary Spoon Makes for Heightened Stirring — Testing the Cutthroat Kitchen Sabotages

Watch Food Network's Cutthroat Kitchen culinary team test potential sabotages before they appear on the show.

©2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

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Stationary Spoon 02:41

Find out if the chefs can stir up creamy risotto with a stationary spoon.

A risotto's success greatly depends on frequent stirring. So when Alton Brown auctioned off a fixed spoon — one suspended several inches in the air — on tonight's brand-new episode of Cutthroat Kitchen, the eviliciousness was in full effect for the chef forced to stir his risotto using only that spoon.

The Cutthroat culinary crew attempted this challenge in the latest installment of Testing the Sabotages, and while the team indeed found the sabotage to be doable, attaining that result was nothing short of surprising — or risky. Filling in for a prop to hold the stationary spoon, food stylist Abel Gonzalez was on hand to assist Jamie Peterson, another food stylist, who tried his hand at making shrimp-studded risotto with the spoon that Abel held. "It's going to be really difficult, because as soon as I lift [the pan] up, I'm getting it off the heat," Jamie said, explaining the drop in temperature every time he moved the pan to meet the spoon. As the rice continued to cook, Jamie managed to remedy that problem by increasing the heat, but in doing so, he nearly singed a few arm hairs off of Abel when a cloud of hot steam shot up from the pan. "I'm actually human, and you actually burned me," Abel told Jamie, reminding his fellow food stylist that he's indeed not a table prop without feelings.

Click the play button on the video above to hear more from Jamie and Abel, and see how they managed to complete the test safely.

Tune in to Cutthroat Kitchen on Sundays at 10|9c, and don't miss Camp Cutthroat every Wednesday at 9|8c.

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