Mushrooms 5 Ways

Super low in calories but packed with energy-producing B-vitamins and even some vitamin D, mushrooms add a flavor boost to your healthy dishes. Whether you prefer them raw or cooked, here are 5 ways to try them.

FRESH MUSHROOM AND PARSLEY SALAD Giada De Laurentiis Giada at Home/We’ll Always Have Paris Food Network Large Button Mushrooms, Flatleaf Parsley, Olive Oil, Lemon Juice, Pepper, Parmesan

Photo by: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Matt Armendariz, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Mushrooms are super low in calories but packed with energy-producing B-vitamins and even some vitamin D. You can't wrong adding these as flavor-boosters to your favorite dishes. Here are five ways to try them.

A Hearty Vegetarian Stew

Shiitake mushroom stems infuse the broth of this stew with a meaty and earthy flavor. Lots more veggies along with whole-grain barley provides 8 grams of hunger-fighting fiber per serving -- that’s tackles more than 30% of the daily recommendation.

Mushroom Salad

Raw button mushrooms match up beautifully with fresh parsley, lemon and the salty bite of Parmesan cheese. Raw mushrooms not your thing? Try them grilled in the same recipe.

Whole-Grain Side Dish

Add sautéed mushrooms to cooked grains such as rice and wheat berries and serve it alongside chicken or fish. Use an assortment of wild mushrooms to elevate the flavors even further.

Steamed Up with Fish

Parchment pouches of tender fish, mushrooms, ginger and honey make for a simple, elegant and light meal.

English Muffin Alternative

Large and flat portobello mushroom caps make a tasty bed for scrambled eggs. They also work nicely with a touch of tomato sauce and cheese for a mini mushroom “pizza.”

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