A Little Bit of Cheese Goes a Long Way

Cheese tips from Food Network Magazine recipe tester Leah Brickley.
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Food Stylist: Rebecca Jurkevich Prop Stylist: Paige Hicks

Photo by: Con Poulos

Con Poulos

The March issue of Food Network Magazine is the cheese issue. While working on the issue, I found that you don't need a ton of cheese to add big flavor; stretching out your cheese means fewer calories, and it's cost effective, too. Use these tips in your everyday cooking:

A little goes a long way. When using strong cheeses like the blue cheese in this month's Turkey Cobb Salad on page 96, remember that sometimes just a sprinkle is enough. We used only 1/4 cup (about 1 tablespoon per person)—that equals just 30 calories.

Reserve your rind. We added a piece of Parmesan rind to the broth for our light Risotto With Yogurt and Peas on page 150 (pictured above). This old-school cooking trick is something grandmothers have been doing for years—it's a cost-saving way to add richness and depth.

Put your peeler to use. Try using it to create the shaved cheddar cheese on our Cheddar and Peanut Butter Bites on page 146. Peeling is a great way to ensure thin pieces of cheese; they're just as satisfying as any hunk.

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