In Season: Raspberries

Raspberries have a sweet-tart flavor and are full of vitamin C and fiber -- a perfect summer berry to enjoy.

We’ve already told you why strawberries and blueberries are healthy eats -- raspberries are next up in this summer berry medley.

What, Where & When

Raspberries, a member of the rose family, are a soft, delicate fruit with a sweet-tart flavor. The actual berries are composed of many connecting “drupelets” (those bumps on the fruit) around a central, pithy core. The seeds are on the outside of the fruit, buried in the flesh. Those tiny "hairs" you see on your berries are thought to help protect the fruit from insects.

The two main cultivated varieties are red ( Rubus ideaus) and black ( Rubus occidentalis), but keep an eye out for other colors. The purple type is a cross between the black and red ones, and the yellow type is a red variation. Red raspberries, the most popular, were gathered in the wild for centuries -- cultivation only started in Europe and North America in the 19th century. Today, top U.S. producers include Washington, Oregon and California, with Washington producing 60% of the U.S.-grown red raspberries.

Nutrition Facts

One cup of raspberries has only 70 calories and minimal fat (less than 1 gram per serving). Raspberries are an excellent source of the antioxidant vitamin C and fiber -- a single serving will give you 50% of your daily vitamin C and 32% of your daily fiber. These juicy morsels also contain anti-inflammatory compounds called anthocyanins, which may help reduce heart disease and diabetes, and improve eyesight and short-term memory. Another phytochemical called quercetin that's found in the berry has been linked to slowing cancer growth.

What To Do With Raspberries

My girls stick fresh raspberries on each fingertip and eat them one at a time (and find it hilarious). These berries also taste delicious with a kiss of whipped cream or sprinkle of sugar. I drop some raspberries on Greek yogurt and drizzle with a touch of honey. They also blend well into a smoothie or a mixed berry fruit salad. Keep your eye out for fresh raspberry jam at your farmers' market -- it goes great in a simple PB&J sandwich.

Those are all very simple preparations. You can get more advanced by making raspberry tarts, cakes and pies. A fresh raspberry sauce works wonders on pork or chicken, and the tartness compliments green salads. If you find yourself with a few extra berries (I can't imagine that!), they freeze well (get some good directions here).

Shopping Tip: Choose brightly colored berries without the hull (an outer covering of leaves). If the hull is attached, they’ve been picked too early and are sure to be extremely tart. Avoid soft, moldy or shriveled berries. Store the berries in the refrigerator, unwashed, for 2 to 3 days. Gently rinse them right before serving -- pre-washing berries increases the growth of mold.

Next Up

In Season: Cucumbers

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In Season: Leeks

Leeks might not be something you experiment much with. I didn't know what to do with them for the longest time, but a little research turned up some endless possibilities. Take a step beyond the same old onions and try these instead.

In Season: Arugula

This leafy green is part of the cabbage family. Sure you’ve had it in a salad, but there is more to learn about this spicy green and lots more creative ways to prepare it.

In Season: Blueberries

Blueberries are a definitely healthy powerhouse -- full of vitamin k, vitamin c, the mineral manganese and the mega-antioxidants, anthocyanidins. Here’s are some recipes to show some blueberry love, especially during National Blueberry Month!

In Season: Peaches

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In Season: Cauliflower

In the same botanical family as cabbage, bok choy and broccoli, cauliflower is the “red-headed step-child” of the cruciferous group. There is more to this underappreciated veggie than meets the eye.

In Season: Eggplant

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In Season: Kumquats

You've probably heard the name but have may have only tried this fruit a couple of times. Get to know these lesser-known members of the citrus family.

In Season: Radishes

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In Season: Pears

Perk up your salads, appetizers or just a simple cheese-and-cracker plate. You can do a lot more with pears than snacking (but that’s still a good way to eat ‘em).