New Study: Kids Eat More Veggies With Dip

A new study found that serving kids vegetables along with dip leads to munching on more veggies.
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Dip_005.tif

If you're looking to up your kids' veggie intake, read this! A new study found that serving vegetables alongside dip leads to munching on more veggies. Interestingly, kids were also found to prefer dips flavored with herbs and spices over plain, more bland dips.

The Study

A 2013 study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics found that adding herbs or spices to a reduced-fat dip increased a child’s willingness to eat veggies. The portion-controlled 3 ½ tablespoon dips served to the kids had 50 calories, 4 grams of fat and 90 milligrams of sodium.

Pre-school children ages 3 to 5 years told researchers from the Center for Childhood Obesity Research at Pennsylvania State University that they liked veggies when paired with a favorite flavored dip compared to eating a veggie without a dip or with a plain dip. Thirty-one percent of kids liked a veggie alone while 64% liked a veggie when it was served with their favorite dip. In addition, 6% of kids refused the vegetable when served with a flavored dip as compared with 18% who refused the veggie when served without any dip.

During a second experiment, researchers found that kids ate significantly more of a previously rejected or disliked veggie when it was offered with a favorite reduced-fat herb dip compared to when it was offered alone.

Dip Recipes To Try

Dips are pretty quick to prepare and you can do so a day or two in advance. Make a colorful crudité platter by cutting up veggies like carrots, celery, squash, cucumbers, red bell peppers and broccoli and have it ready to go when the kids need a snack.

TELL US: Do your kids like to dip?
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