How to Eat a Lobster

Learn how to properly eat a lobster.

Materials

  • Cooked lobster
  • Chef knife
  • Scissors

Step-by-Step Instructions

For the claw:

  1. Hold the tip of the claw.
  2. Using the back end of a knife, give the claw a few little taps to crack it, and then give it a strong tap so that your knife is in the shell but not all the way through.
  3. Once the knife is lodged in the claw, turn it so the shell breaks in half.
  4. The shell can then be pulled right off and the claw meat can be eaten.

For the knuckle:

  1. Break off the bigger part of the knuckle.
  2. Using your pinky finger, push the meat out of the bigger part of the knuckle.

For the tail:

  1. Cut down the middle of the underside of the shell using scissors.
  2. Use both hands and push the shell towards the cut made along the bottom, so the back shell cracks.
  3. Pull the tail out of the broken shell.
  4. Pull the fins off at the end of the tail and suck the meat out.
  5. The same can be done for the legs of the lobster.

Next Up

Prawns vs Shrimp: What's the Difference?

Their names are sometimes used interchangeably, but are they really the same thing?

How to Steam Shrimp

A step-by-step guide to steaming plump, juicy and flavorful shrimp.

How to Cook Scallops

Shop, prep and sear scallops like a pro.

How Long Does Shrimp Last in the Fridge?

Shrimp is popular and easy to cook, but its shelf life is pretty short. Here's everything you need to know.

How to Boil Shrimp

Get a step-by-step guide to boil any kind of shrimp, plus some of our favorite recipes for shrimp cocktail and more.

3 Grilled Shrimp Marinades to Keep in Your Back Pocket

These all-season recipes make quick work of dinner on an outdoor grill or on a grill pan in the kitchen.

How to Eat Crawfish

The owner of a famous Creole cuisine restaurant answers all your questions.

How to Shuck Oysters

A step-by-step guide to shucking oysters like a pro — with or without an oyster knife.

5-Star Fish and Seafood Dishes

You won't miss meat at all.

Bacteria Found in Raw Oysters Linked To Serious Infections in the Northeast

A food safety experts explains how you can stay safe.

Latest Stories