A Guide for Buying and Cooking Squid

A Guide for Cooking Squid

FoodNetwork-Fish7/13/06

Photo by: Theresa Raffetto ©Theresa Raffetto

Theresa Raffetto, Theresa Raffetto

Squid, also known as calamari, has an appealing, mild flavor and, if correctly cooked, a tender, succulent texture. Squid bodies and tentacles are sold fresh and cleaned of viscera and its thin, purplish skin. Frozen squid is sold whole or cut up for cooking.

Cook squid briefly (for a few seconds) or braise it long enough for it to toughen and then become tender again. A popular method for quick cooking is to cut the bodies into rounds, coat in breading and deep-fry. Stir-frying and sautéing also work well. The bodies may also be left whole, stuffed and braised in the oven.

Substitute other shellfish such as shrimp, lobster or scallops.

Squid Recipes

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