Chowder and Soup

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Q: What is the difference between chowder and soup? 

A: Chowder's roots are in the Northeast, with the most popular being New England Clam Chowder. It has been said that the soup took its name from a type of French cooking vessel, the chaudiere. But the French can't claim responsibility, for this truly is an American tradition. Customarily, chowder included onion, potatoes, and cream. Nowadays, not all chowders adhere to these guidelines. New England Clam Chowder is sometimes made with milk, whereas Manhattan Clam Chowder doesn't have any milk or cream but has a tomato base instead. As chowders pop up across the country, they have taken on many different ingredients but most people still expect a chunky, creamy soup. So whether it's corn chowder or seafood chowder, it will not be a smooth puree and it will not be thin and wimpy.

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